Workshops

Friday 26 June

Full day workshops, 8am - 3:30pm

Half day morning workshops, 8am - 11:30am

Half day afternoon workshops, 11:30am - 3:30pm

Saturday 27 June

Full day workshops, 10am - 5:30pm

Half day morning workshops, 10am - 2pm

Half day afternoon workshop/masterclass, 2pm - 5:30pm

Sunday 28 June

Half day workshops, 10am - 2pm


Imagery Rescripting: a transdiagnostic technique to address problems related to traumatic and other negative experiences.

Workshop Fully Booked

Presenter: Arnold Arntz

Workshop Abstract

In Imagery Rescripting the meaning of the memory representation of a traumatic (or otherwise negative) event is changed by having the patient imagine as lively as possible a different outcome that meets the needs of the patient better. Imagery Rescripting is a powerful technique with empirical evidence for its effectiveness across disorders. It can be integrated in various forms of psychotherapy, or used as a complete treatment. Imagery Rescripting can be applied to memories of events that really happened in the past, but also to imagined events (like in nightmares, or feared future catastrophes). Although it is often applied when patients report intrusions (esp. of a visual kind), the technique can also successfully applied to change the meaning of experiences that contributed to dysfunctional schemas. Although its name suggests that the original memory representation is erased, research indicates that this is not the case. Rather, it seems the meaning of the memory (and not the memory of facts) that is changed.

The workshop will focus on the generic use of Imagery Rescripting, so that participants can use the technique in a variety of clinical problems, including PTSD, social phobia, chronic depression, and personality disorders. The basic protocol will be introduced, with both the therapist changing the script, and the patient from an observer perspective changing the script. Methods to increase the impact on the original memory representation, especially when it comes to (traumatic) childhood experiences will be discussed. Other issues that will be treated include when to start the rescripting, that full reliving of trauma memories is unnecessary, and dealing with problems like dissociation.

The workshop will be active, that is participants will practice techniques in pairs while support is provided; and there will be an interactive part where participants can raise questions and bring in specific cases.

Biography

Arnoud Arntz is professor of Clinical Psychology at the University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands. His main research interests lie in the fields of anxiety and personality disorders, both applied and fundamental. He also practices as a psychotherapist at De Viersprong Institute in Amsterdam, where he treats patients with personality disorders. Together with Adam Radomsky he is editor of the Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry.
His research focuses on psychological processes underlying personality disorders (PDs), especially borderline personality disorder (BPD), and anxiety disorders, especially PTSD; and their treatment. Using the approach of experimental psychopathology he tested psychological theories of anxiety disorders and PDs and contributed to the development of their psychological treatment. In developing and testing psychological theories and treatments he aims to connect basic research and clinical work. He is perhaps best known for his contributions to the development of Schema Therapy and Imagery Rescripting. Professor Arntz feels that clinical work is essential to connect the areas of basic research with clinical applications. He was project leader of the multicenter RCT that compared schema therapy (ST) to a form of psychodynamic psychotherapy for BPD patients (Transference Focused Psychotherapy), and of another multicenter RCT that compared ST to treatment as usual (TAU) and CCT for 6 other PDs. Currently he is, together with Dr Joan Farrell, PI of the international RCT that compares group-ST to TAU in 448 BPD patients of sites in 6 countries. Professor Arntz also chairs a Dutch-German collaborative study investigating basic brain and cognitive processes in BPD and their change during treatment, which is associated with the international RCT on group-ST.


The nature and treatment of anxiety disorders in children and adolescents

Presenter: Ronald Rapee

Workshop Abstract

For some years we have been conducting the Cool Kids treatment programs for anxious children and adolescents at Macquarie University. Treatment is conducted over approximately 10 sessions and both parents and children are involved.  Data from these and similar programs indicate a high degree of success with most children showing moderate to marked change and results maintaining for several years. Typically around 60% of young people show remission following these types of programs. So how might we get this percentage higher? And what do we do with treatment non-responders?

Objectives

In this workshop we will discuss understanding of child and adolescent anxiety disorders and factors that might impede response to treatment. We will briefly discuss the standard Cool Kids program and will then move on to cover modifications and applications to help those children who are not improving.  At the conclusion of the workshop, participants should be able to:

  1. Have a broad appreciation for the maintenance and psychopathology of anxiety disorders in young people
  2. Have a detailed understanding of treatment programs for the management of child and adolescent anxiety (eg Cool Kids).
  3. Handle nonresponsive cases and difficulties in treatment responsiveness.

Teaching Method

The workshop mostly makes use of the experience of the presenter. When time allows some videos of treatment sessions and case material are included. Questions and discussion from the participants is strongly encouraged. Participants are encouraged to bring along cases with which they are experiencing difficulty for discussion.

Biography

Ron Rapee is currently Distinguished Professor in the Department of Psychology, Macquarie University, Sydney and director of the Centre for Emotional Health. He has published extensively on the understanding and management of emotional difficulties across the lifespan and has written and edited books for professionals and the general public. Prof Rapee has received several awards for his scientific contributions, including the Distinguished Contribution to Science from the Australian Psychological Society. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia and in 2012 was made a Member of the Order of Australia for his contributions to clinical psychology.


Exposure Treatment for PTSD

Presenter: Mark Creamer

Workshop Abstract

This workshop is designed for experienced mental health clinicians who may work with survivors of trauma suffering from PTSD and related conditions, and who wish to learn how to conduct prolonged exposure with this population. There is international consensus that trauma focused psychological interventions are the treatment of choice for PTSD and, of these, exposure has the strongest body of empirical support. This workshop will teach participants the skills required to implement exposure in their clinical practice. There will be frequent use of video examples and ample opportunity for audience participation and discussion.

The workshop will be divided into four sections and will broadly cover the following areas:

  • Preparing for exposure treatment in PTSD (theoretical background, treatment planning, arousal management)
  • Conducting exposure: The ground rules and procedures, developing a hierarchy
  • Conducting imaginal exposure: A step by step guide
  • Potential difficulties in imaginal exposure and how to manage them

Biography

Professor Mark Creamer, BA(Hons), MA(Clin), PhD, FAPS.  Mark is a clinical psychologist, internationally recognised for his work in posttraumatic mental health. He was Director of the Australian Centre for Posttraumatic Mental Health for 15 years and is currently a Professorial Fellow in the Psychiatry Department at Melbourne University. His research record includes over 150 journal articles, three books, and many book chapters. Over the last 25 years, he has worked with individuals, communities, and organizations following traumatic events of natural and human origin.  Mark now provides clinical, policy, teaching, and research advice to government and non-government organisations, as well as to health professionals, on issues relating to traumatic stress. In 2011, he was awarded the prestigious Lifetime Achievement Award by the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.


A different gaze and a different aesthetic: A workshop to explore the observational stance in psychodynamic psychotherapy

Presenter: Dr Allan Shafer

Workshop Abstract

This workshop explores the development of the psychotherapist’s subjective observational capacities. It focuses on the conscious and unconscious dynamic emotional experiences that emerge in the therapeutic dyad. Emotional experience – often inchoate – a central feature of human life and a core phenomenon in the therapeutic relationship can most solicitously be accessed via subjective observation.

Subjective observation is rarely formally taught in the training of psychotherapists – indeed it is often decried. Participants will learn how to attend to, understand and apply the subjective observation of emergent emotional experience.

Biography

Dr Allan Shafer(Clinical Psychologist) has over 35 years’ experience as a psychoanalytic psychotherapist, clinical supervisor and socio-analyst. Originally trained in South Africa, he has worked primarily in private practice in Perth, and since 2011 in Melbourne. He has a particular interest in the dynamics of the therapeutic relationship.

He was president of the Association for Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy of WA and is a member of the Victorian Association for Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy, and was an executive member of the Psychotherapy Association of Australasia. He is President of Group Relations Australia.

He has consulted to mental health, educational, religious and other organizations in Australia, South Africa and the USA, and directed or consulted on the staff of group relations conferences in Australia, Israel, India, Poland and the UK.


Cognitive behaviour therapy and stroke

Presenter: Ian Kneebone

Workshop Abstract

Stroke is a major cause of disability. There are currently over 400,000 people living with the effects of stroke in Australia. Problems after stroke can include inability to walk, to wash and dress independently and communication difficulties. In addition at least 35 per cent of those with stroke will have cognitive (e.g., memory/ concentration) impairment, and many will suffer emotional difficulties (e.g., around a third will suffer from depression and /or anxiety). This workshop will consider stroke and its emotional impact. The best means for identifying and monitoring change in emotional difficulties after stroke will be reviewed and a framework for modified CBT intervention will be considered.  Particular attention will be given in the workshop to managing fear of falling, a common problem after stroke. The workshop will be informed by the current evidence base for CBT after stroke and include role play exercises and video of live casework.

Biography

Professor Ian Kneebone completed undergraduate degrees at the University of Adelaide, a masters degree in clinical psychology at the University of Western Australia and a doctorate in clinical psychology at the University of Surrey. He has specialised in rehabilitation and worked with older and younger people who have encountered stroke for over thirty years. He has published widely on stroke, including on the assessment and management of mood disorders, the coping of informal carers of people who develop speech and language problems and on breaking bad news. He currently holds an NHMRC grant to investigate the prevention of depression in this population. Ian is a co-author of Psychological Management of Stroke, (Wiley, 2012) and was a member of the Core Steering Group that developed the National Stroke Strategy for England.  Ian has a Chair in Clinical Psychology at the University of Western Sydney and is a Visiting Professor at the University of Surrey, UK.


21st Century Clinical Practice- future proofing your practice with affordable, easy to use technologies you and your patients will appreciate.

Presenter: Lesley Posen

Workshop Abstract

We are moving into what's been called a Post-PC era - one when computers are changing form and function, where we carry with us in our pockets smartphones and devices which can augment and extend our clinical work, and help patients achieve great outcomes. In this workshop, Les Posen will look at the place of technologies in our lives, both personally and professionally, and provide you with a sampling of technologies he uses in his practice to great effect. Not just does do they improve practice workflow, but patients report greater engagement and better emotional regulation.

Les will offer hands-on demos of current and “just around the corner” devices, including wearable devices and show how to integrate them in your current workflow to great effect.

If you think the time has come to take your practice to another level, this is the workshop for you.

Biography

Les Posen has been a practising psychologist for 30 years, a member of the Clinical College for almost 20, a fellow of the APS for eight, and a technology early adopter all his life!

He is in independent practice in Melbourne where he specialises in augmenting his clinical work in anxiety disorders with cutting edge technologies. He will be well known to APS members for his InPsych columns on technology, and he regularly consults with colleagues to assist them to move their practices into a more effective workflow using easy to use technologies.

Les also conducts workshops on presentation skills for a variety of professions, and those attending will get a bonus workshop of how to keep audiences engaged!


Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) - Introductory Workshop

Presenter: Philip Watts

Abstract

The focus of the workshop is on practical skills training in the use of the PAI.  The introductory section involves a discussion of why one would choose the PAI over other common tests; how to administer it; and then focuses on the clinical scales.   Using a real case, each scale will be discussed.  The level of teaching assumes no prior knowledge of the PAI.    At the end of the workshop you should know how to interpret a PAI profile but will need practice to become proficient.

Biography

Dr Phil Watts is well known forensic psychologist from WA who is also an adjunct associate professor in clinical psychology at the University of Canberra.   He has a great interest in psychological testing and is currently developing Australian family court norms for the PAI.  With over 22 years’ experience conducting assessments and running training, his workshops are highly regarded for their practical application.


How to understand sex offenders and to conceptualise their risk.

Presenter: Katie Seidler

Workshop Abstract

Sex offenders are a clinical cohort that are not only misunderstood but often shunned by the community and actively avoided by clinicians.  However, they are a high needs and vulnerable group, who often present with comorbid clinical issues and are in need of treatment.  This half day workshop/masterclass aims to introduce participants to an understanding of why sexual offenders behave as they do, in addition to gaining an appreciation of the issues pertaining to risk identification and management across both the criminal and civil domains.

Presenter Biography

Dr Katie Seidler: I am a clinical and forensic psychologist with a PhD in Psychology, with the primary research focus being on understanding interpersonal violence through the rubric of cultural experience. I have been practising since 1996 and have worked in providing treatment to both juvenile and adult offenders, with particular experience specialising in sexual and violent offenders. I have been working in the treatment and assessment of sex offenders since 1996 and have developed a run treatment programmes in this area, as well as conducting both qualitative and quantitative research with sex offenders.  I currently treat sex offenders both individually and in a group and I also assess sex offenders in the civil and criminal domains.  I am accredited as a supervisor with the NSW Commission for Children and Young People’s Child Sex Offender Counsellor Accreditation Scheme and I have been on the executive committee of the Australia and New Zealand Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abuse for well over ten years.


Shake Rattle and Roll that Stinking Thinking.

Presenter: Monica O Kelly

Workshop Abstract

That unhelpful thoughts lead to unhelpful and maladaptive feelings and behaviour is a basic tenet of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy. However the process of changing these maladaptive thoughts is more complex than identifying the unhelpful thought and simply saying don’t think “that” but think “this” or giving the client a list of dysfunctional thoughts to help them identify what they are doing wrong. Whether we call the process re-evaluating, reassessing, questioning or disputing the thoughts they need to be shaken, rattled and rolled to lead to a cognitive shift. This workshop will focus on developing the participant’s skill and knowledge to identify unhelpful beliefs and understand the nature of the cognition. A comprehensive approach to challenging cognitions will be shared with the participants using logical, empirical and pragmatic approaches as well as the four styles; didactic, Socratic, metaphor and humour. Participants will be given practical exercises to enhance skill development. This workshop will require active participation by the attendees. It is anticipated that at the end of the workshop participants will also have increased their repertoire of skills to shake, rattle and roll their clients stinking thinking.

Biography

Dr Monica O’Kelly - B Sc (Hons), Dip Ed, MB Sc, PhD, FAPS (CClin, CEDP) is Director of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Australia. She is also Director of the Australian Institute for Rational Emotive Behaviour Therapy and an adjunct senior lecturer in the School of Psychology and Psychiatry at Monash University.

Monica has trained in Rational Emotive Behaviour Therapy at the Albert Ellis Institute in New York and is an Associate Fellow of the Institute. She has also completed the Extramural Training Program at the Beck Institute in Philadelphia and is a Fellow of the Academy of Cognitive Therapy. Monica is author of the book CBT in Action: A practitioner’s toolkit and has published many articles and chapters in the area of CBT as well as producing demonstration DVDs.

After leaving university, Monica worked as a psychologist with children, adolescents and adults in a variety of government and educational settings before going into private practice. In the thirty years Monica has been working as a psychologist, she has worked with clients suffering a range of problems. She has an interest in helping people rebuild their lives after trauma and childhood abuse. She sees herself as an emotion coach.

Monica has been involved in training therapists in CBT for over twenty years throughout Australia and in New Zealand, Vietnam, Singapore, Malaysia, and Hong Kong. More recently she has trained practitioners in Papua New Guinea. She takes an active learning approach and believes that skills need to be modelled for trainees and that trainees benefit from skills practice.


Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) – Advanced Workshop

Presenter: Dr Philip Watts

Workshop  Abstract

The PAI-SP software has many special features which assist in advanced interpretation.  This workshop examines these features with a special focus on response style indicators, and detecting positive and negative (malingering) response patterns.  It includes a discussion of the software features which allows for advance interpretation and it includes analysing a number of protocols to establish confidence in using this tool both in formal assessments and clinical cases.  The afternoon assumes a working knowledge of the PAI (including either completing the morning training, or past training).  Suitable for experience users who want to maximise the utility of this tool.

Biography

Dr Phil Watts is well known forensic psychologist from WA who is also an adjunct associate professor in clinical psychology at the University of Canberra.   He has a great interest in psychological testing and is currently developing Australian family court norms for the PAI.  With over 22 years’ experience conducting assessments and running training, his workshops are highly regarded for their practical application.


How to Work Clinically with Sex offenders in order to reduce their risk

Presenter: Dr Katie Seidler

Workshop Abstract

This workshop/masterclass aims to introduce participants to the primary treatment models applicable within the forensic domain generally, in addition to reviewing the treatment approaches that are relevant specifically within the forensic field for sex offenders.  The treatment process and challenges thereof will be outlined for participants covering both individual and group treatment modalities.  Clinical examples will be offered and case studies explored with a view to conceptualising treatment and the application of risk management with this vulnerable, challenging and high needs client group.

Biography

Dr Katie Seidler: I am a clinical and forensic psychologist with a PhD in Psychology, with the primary research focus being on understanding interpersonal violence through the rubric of cultural experience. I have been practising since 1996 and have worked in providing treatment to both juvenile and adult offenders, with particular experience specialising in sexual and violent offenders. I have been working in the treatment and assessment of sex offenders since 1996 and have developed a run treatment programmes in this area, as well as conducting both qualitative and quantitative research with sex offenders.  I currently treat sex offenders both individually and in a group and I also assess sex offenders in the civil and criminal domains.  I am accredited as a supervisor with the NSW Commission for Children and Young People’s Child Sex Offender Counsellor Accreditation Scheme and I have been on the executive committee of the Australia and New Zealand Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abuse for well over ten years.


Advanced DBT Workshop:  Getting DBT Skills into the Session and into the Client's Life

Presenter: Alan Fruzzetti

Workshop Abstract

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) has been shown in dozens of studies to be effective in treating the many problems associated with emotion dysregulation.   Recent research studies have shown consistently that clients experience better outcomes when they learn and generalizeg DBT skills.  After a brief orientation to the details of the treatment model used to get skills into the session, demonstrations, role plays, and practical exercises will be used to help participants enhance their DBT in-session skills, even with clients with difficult problems.

Biography

Alan E. Fruzzetti, Ph.D., is a Professor of Psychology and Director of the Dialectical Behavior Therapy and Research Program at the University of Nevada, Reno.  He received his B.A. from Brown University and M.S. & Ph.D. from the University of Washington in Seattle. His research focuses on the interplay between severe psychopathology and interpersonal processes (including couple and family interactions, partner abuse, and therapist-client interactions, and their interplay with emotion dysregulation) and the development and evaluation of effective individual and family treatments for these problems.  Prof. Fruzzetti is Research Director and a Member of the Board of Directors of the National Education Alliance for Borderline Personality Disorder and member of the Board of Directors of the International Society for the Investigation and Teaching of DBT, and on the Scientific Advisory Board of the Linehan Institute.  He has authored nearly 100 research and clinical papers and book chapters, and two books, and is the co-creator of the NEA-BPD Family Connections program, for parents, partners, and other loved ones of people with BPD and related problems. He was honored as the “Psychologist of the Year” in Nevada in 2010 and honored by the International Society for DBT with its career “DBT Research Award” in 2013.  In addition to maintaining an active clinical practice, Dr. Fruzzetti has created multiple successful DBT applications for individuals, couples, parents, and families and has provided extensive training in the United States, Europe, Australia and New Zealand in DBT, behavior therapy, and family interventions.


Navigating the challenges of chronic pain management

Presenter: Sarah Overton

Workshop Abstract

Recent advances in the management of anxiety disorders have had parallel advances in the management of pain, including understanding the importance of avoidance, safety behaviours and exposure to pain and pain-related stimuli (both overt and interoceptive) along with addressing the meaning of pain: “hurt ≠ harm”. Thus clinical psychologists now play a pivotal role in establishing an active self-management approach to pain.

This full day workshop will examine the current understanding of pain and the role that psychological processes play. It will review DSM diagnoses relating to pain, the prevalence of pain, risk factors for chronicity and it will cover basic concepts such as acute vs chronic pain, central sensitisation, neuropathic pain and fear-avoidance. The role and limitations of biomedical approaches to pain will be discussed, followed by the details of conducting assessment within a biopsychosocial model, interpreting a range of relevant measures, case formulation and establishing active self-management.

At the completion of this workshop participants will have a sound understanding of the components of a structured program including: setting personally relevant goals and upgrading towards those goals using pacing and establishing tolerances; the use of relaxation and interoceptive exposure; thought management and making an effective plan to deal with flare-ups. They will feel confident to work with other health professionals, such as doctors and physiotherapists, towards the goals of increased function and active self-management. 

Participants will practice specific skills with case studies and discussions. They will formulate and present cases to the group and will be encouraged to discuss difficult patients and obstacles to progress. Pre-reading materials will be provided.

Biography

Dr Sarah Overton (BA Hons MA Hons Cantab, Mpsychol, PhD University of Sydney) is a Senior Clinical Psychologist at the Michael J Cousins Pain Management & Research Centre at Royal North Shore Hospital. Her work includes runnings the intensive pain management program ADAPT, as part of an interdisciplinary team, and conducting comprehensive assessment of chronic pain patients within a biopsychosocial model. She is a Clinical Lecturer on the Graduate Studies in Pain Management Program with the University of Sydney Medical School. She has an active interest in improving clinical management of people with chronic pain and is on the Service Development Committee and Outcomes and Research Committee of the NSW Agency for Clinical Innovation, Pain Management Network. Her current research entails developing and testing a screening tool to identify patients at risk of transitioning from acute to chronic postsurgial pain.


Eating Disorders– what every clinician needs to know

Workshop Fully Booked

Presenter: Dr Anthea Fursland

Workshop Abstract

Eating Disorders (EDs) are complex conditions with medical and psychological risk and a high level of mortality. Furthermore, sufferers tend to be highly ambivalent of change. As a result, many clinicians avoid this population and have little knowledge of ED treatment. Yet EDs are much more common than previously thought, with up to 15% of Australian females suffering from an ED in their lifetime and over 7% of psychiatric outpatients suffering from a current ED – one in 15. Since psychologists in all settings are likely to encounter people with EDs, it is imperative that they can identify and treat these disorders. This workshop aims to demystify EDs, help clinicians understand the processes that maintain them, and feel more confident about working with individuals with EDs. We will offer a brief overview of Enhanced Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT-E), a transdiagnostic approach.

Biography - Dr. Anthea Fursland

Dr. Anthea Fursland is Acting Director of the Centre for Clinical Interventions (CCI) and Principal Clinical Psychologist of the Eating Disorders Programme at CCI, the only public specialist eating disorders service in Western Australia for youth and adults. She obtained her Masters (Clinical Psychology) in London, then worked in the NHS and in private practice. She trained at the Women’s Therapy Centre (with Susie Orbach) and moved to Berkeley, California, where she obtained her PhD. Her work in the US was in the private sector, both private practice and a large insurance organisation. In addition to her clinical work at CCI, Anthea is involved in applied clinical research, service development, supervision, consultation, training and education (of GPs, mental health practitioners and carers). She has trained clinicians in WA, VIC, QLD and NSW in Enhanced CBT. She has created a web-based self-help resource on eating disorders http://www.cci.health.wa.gov.au/resources/infopax.cfm?Info_ID=48 and co-authored several peer-reviewed papers. Anthea is Past President of the Australia and New Zealand Academy of Eating Disorders (ANZAED) and on the Steering Committee of the National Eating Disorders Collaboration (NEDC). She is active in the international Academy of Eating Disorders (AED) and a co-chair of the 2015 AED Conference. In 2011 Anthea was elected as a Fellow of AED.


Enhanced Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Eating Disorders – discussing the strategies

Presenter: Dr Anthea Fursland

Workshop Abstract

Enhanced Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT-E) is an innovative transdiagnostic treatment developed in the UK by Christopher Fairburn. This workshop will focus on advanced CBT skills. Various techniques and strategies will be described in detail, using role plays and experiential practice, in order that workshop participants gain not only an understanding of the techniques but the confidence to utilise them in their own practice.

Biography - Dr. Anthea Fursland

Dr. Anthea Fursland is Acting Director of the Centre for Clinical Interventions (CCI) and Principal Clinical Psychologist of the Eating Disorders Programme at CCI, the only public specialist eating disorders service in Western Australia for youth and adults. She obtained her Masters (Clinical Psychology) in London, then worked in the NHS and in private practice. She trained at the Women’s Therapy Centre (with Susie Orbach) and moved to Berkeley, California, where she obtained her PhD. Her work in the US was in the private sector, both private practice and a large insurance organisation. In addition to her clinical work at CCI, Anthea is involved in applied clinical research, service development, supervision, consultation, training and education (of GPs, mental health practitioners and carers). She has trained clinicians in WA, VIC, QLD and NSW in Enhanced CBT. She has created a web-based self-help resource on eating disorders http://www.cci.health.wa.gov.au/resources/infopax.cfm?Info_ID=48 and co-authored several peer-reviewed papers. Anthea is Past President of the Australia and New Zealand Academy of Eating Disorders (ANZAED) and on the Steering Committee of the National Eating Disorders Collaboration (NEDC). She is active in the international Academy of Eating Disorders (AED) and a co-chair of the 2015 AED Conference. In 2011 Anthea was elected as a Fellow of AED.


Contemporary CBT Treatment for Generalised Anxiety Disorder

Presenter: Sarah Edelman

Workshop Abstract

In the last decade there has been a significant transformation in mainstream treatments for generalised anxiety disorder. As our understanding of the disorder and the processes that maintain it have grown, many conventional therapies (including relaxation, disputing and problem solving) have given way to more innovative treatments. Many of these focus on cognitive processes rather than content of thoughts.

By the end of this workshop participants will be able to describe contemporary CBT models of Generalised Anxiety Disorder, and will be able to administer treatments that target key features of the disorder, as defined by these models. These will include case formulation, worry awareness training, meta-cognitive therapy, mindfulness techniques, imagery, metaphor and behavioural experiments.

The workshop will focus on practical skills development. Treatments will be demonstrated using case studies, small group discussion and role play. In addition to workshop slides, participants will receive a number of prepared handouts for use with clients.

Biography

Sarah Edelman PhD is a clinical psychologist in private practice. She worked at the University of Technology Sydney for 13 years, originally as a researcher in health psychology and subsequently as a lecturer in the Master of Applied Psychotherapy program. Sarah facilitates training programs for psychologists and GPs at the Black Dog Institute Sydney, and in regional NSW. She is also a regular presenter for the APS. Sarah also runs training programs for business organisations, and conducts regular workshops on the use of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy at Sydney University Centre for Continuing Education. She has published several articles on the use of CBT with medically ill patients in professional journals, and has contributed articles in the mainstream media. She is a frequent guest on 702 ABC radio, and her book ‘Change your Thinking” (3rd edition) is a best seller in the self-help genre.


Applying and Trouble-Shooting CBT focused Intervention with children and adolescents with complex presentations of anxiety and depression

Workshop Fully Booked

Presenter: Margaret Jones

Workshop Abstract

Children and adolescents seen in mental health services often have complex presentations and delivering evidence-based interventions can be a challenge. This workshop will focus on strategies for applying interventions and an empirically informed template for trouble-shooting difficulties using materials from two CBT interventions developed and evaluated in CAMHS PEP, (CAMHS Program for Evidence-based Psychotherapies) in CAMHS Western Australia. Interventions focus on children with complex anxiety disorders (‘worry busters”), and adolescents with depression (‘mood boosters”).  The interventions were originally designed to compliment treatment as usual in CAMHS (Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services). Participants will be expected to familiarise themselves with some of the materials prior to the workshop via pre-workshop reading.

Biography

In 2012, Marg Jones celebrated 30 years as a clinical psychologist working for Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services in WA. During this time she has held a variety of roles: as a clinician, supervisor, and co-ordinator of clinical psychology, senior policy officer, researcher, teacher, and manager. She has worked in community mental health settings, inpatient settings, and also as a fly in fly out monthly Child and Adolescent Health Dept clinical psychologist to the Pilbara. She has in the last ten years consulted on behalf of the State to the Commonwealth expert groups on outcomes in Mental Health and Disaster Response.

Her current position is as the Consultant Clinical psychologist for Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services in WA. This position is the lead clinical psychology position for CAMHS. Her position provides strategic advice, consultation and supervision, teaches specialised clinical skills to clinical psychologists and others, conducts/facilitates specialist research and liaises with relevant professional organizations, other specialist health professionals, government and non-government agencies and Universities to instigate contemporary practice models. She works one day a week in private practice.


Why and How Mindfulness Meditation Produces Profound Changes: A New Understanding of Reinforcement Mechanisms and their Neurological Correlates         

Presenter: Dr Bruno Cayoun   

Abstract:

Although the clinical efficacy of mindfulness-based interventions is now well documented, the active mechanisms of mindfulness meditation remain often unclear, making clinical decisions difficult with under-responsive clients. In this workshop, the neurobehavioural mechanisms underlying behaviour maintenance and change will be explained through the Co-emergence model of reinforcement, which expands our common understanding of classical, operant, and vicarious conditioning. The important implications that this model of reinforcement may have for therapy will be exemplified through filmed demonstrations of immediate and lasting distress reduction with a client diagnosed with PTSD, chronic pain, chronic depression and methadone dependence. This workshop will provide a strong theoretical and practical basis for the integration of mindfulness practice with traditional CBT and its use as a transdiagnostic therapy approach. It will be of particular relevance to clinicians and academics interested in conditioning principles and how to improve their applications in clinical contexts. Those who implement a mindfulness-based intervention will also have an opportunity to deepen their understanding of the method they are using.

Biography:

Dr Bruno Cayoun is Director of the MiCBT Institute, a registered training organisation in Hobart, Tasmania, which trains, accredits and supports MiCBT practitioners. He is a Clinical Psychologist in private practice and the principal developer of Mindfulness-integrated Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (MiCBT), which he has been teaching to mental health professionals internationally since 2003. He has practised mindfulness meditation and undergone intensive training in mindfulness centres in France, Nepal, India, and Australia for over 25 years. Dr Cayoun is also a mindfulness researcher, in collaboration with several universities in Australia and abroad. He is the author of three books, including Mindfulness-integrated CBT: Principles and Practice (Wiley, 2011) and Mindfulness-integrated CBT for Well-being and Personal Growth (Wiley, 2015). He is the principal developer of several questionnaires, including the Mindfulness based Self-Efficacy Scale.


Expanding Understanding and Implementation of Mindfulness-integrated CBT – Master class

Presenter: Dr Bruno Cayoun   

Abstract:

Mindfulness skills are being increasingly included in therapy models using cognitive and behavioural techniques. However, integrating mindfulness training with core components of CBT skilfully is a complex and demanding process, primarily because the theoretical framework from which clinicians using mindfulness operate is often unclear or absent, and practitioners are frequently provided with ill-defined rationales for each skill to be developed. This master class will first provide a robust rationale for integrating mindfulness meditation with traditional CBT, and illustrate such integration with the four stages of Mindfulness-integrated Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (MiCBT) and their transdiagnostic applications. Bruno will respond to participants’ cases and provide feedback and clarification for treatment. Participants will also learn to case conceptualise clients’ presentation according to the MiCBT theoretical framework and facilitate or improve their approach to using mindfulness in therapy. It is also an opportunity to learn from the principal developer of MiCBT.

Biography:

Dr Bruno Cayoun is Director of the MiCBT Institute, a registered training organisation in Hobart, Tasmania, which trains, accredits and supports MiCBT practitioners. He is a Clinical Psychologist in private practice and the principal developer of Mindfulness-integrated Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (MiCBT), which he has been teaching to mental health professionals internationally since 2003. He has practised mindfulness meditation and undergone intensive training in mindfulness centres in France, Nepal, India, and Australia for over 25 years. Dr Cayoun is also a mindfulness researcher, in collaboration with several universities in Australia and abroad. He is the author of three books, including Mindfulness-integrated CBT: Principles and Practice (Wiley, 2011) and Mindfulness-integrated CBT for Well-being and Personal Growth (Wiley, 2015). He is the principal developer of several questionnaires, including the Mindfulness based Self-Efficacy Scale.


Psychopathy Screening Version (PCL-SV) Training

Workshop Fully Booked

Presenter: Douglas Boer

Workshop Abstract

The PCL-SV is a 12 item “screening version” devised by Stephen Hart along with Robert Hare and David Cox. It is a simplified version of the original Psychopathy Checklist – Revised test by Robert Hare. The PCL-SV has much less reliance on official criminal records than does the PCL-R and has appeal to clinicians in its reliance on structured judgement regarding antisocial behaviour. Information gained from the PCL-SV can be used to help inform risk management strategies, as well as help with risk formulation using other instruments such as the Sexual Violence Risk-20, Risk for Sexual Violence Protocol, Spousal Abuse Risk Assessment, or the Historical-Clinical-Risk-20.

The workshop will briefly review the supportive data for the PCL-SV, and then provide an overview of the items for participants. An overview of a case example will also be reviewed. The integration of the results of the PCL-SV into other risk assessment measures will also be addressed. Finally, treatment implications for individuals who score high on the measure will be discussed.

Biography

Douglas Boer is currently Professor of Clinical Psychology in Psychology at the University of Canberra (Australia). Prior to his current position, he worked as an academic at the University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand for seven years and before that he worked for the Correctional Service of Canada for 15 years in a variety of contexts including sex offender therapist and treatment programme supervisor. He has published a number of articles and structured clinical assessment manuals for use with sexual offenders. Professor Boer is also on approximately 10 editorial boards including the Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, Sexual Abuse: Australia, New Zealand, and the British Journal of Forensic Practice. Finally, he is an active clinician, assessor, and clinical supervisor.


‘The Eternal Triangle’: A Schema Therapy approach to Affairs

Presenter: Bruce Stevens

Workshop Abstract

How do we manage an affair or even serial affairs in couple therapy?  This is always a challenge since many couples end their relationship or marriage; some come through with a realistic, even better relationship after working through the impact of the affair.  Schema Therapy offers a rich model for understanding affairs in terms of mode dynamics, for example considering which mode(s) is driving the affair and how this might determine effective interventions (from individual work in re-parenting to couple work using the Mode Cycle Clashcard and chair-work).  Participants are encouraged to bring a case, involving an affair, to discuss in small groups and to develop a ST case formulation and treatment plan.

Biography

Dr Stevens is a co-author with Chiara DiFrancesco and Eckhard Roediger onSchema Therapy for Couples: A Practitioner Guide to Healing Relationships(in press with Wiley). Professor  Bruce Stevens (PhD Boston University, 1987) is the Wicking Chair of Aging and Practical Theology at Charles Sturt University in Barton, ACT. He also has a part-time private practice at Canberra Clinical and Forensic Psychology, a practice he founded in the early 1990’s.  He was chair of the Canberra section of the Clinical College of the Australian Psychological Society for four years and has helped to organize the Clinical College conferences since 2011.  He gives many professional workshops on couple therapy throughout Australia.  He has written five books most recently a practitioner book with Dr Arnstein   Happy ever after? A practical guide to relationship counselling for clinical psychologists. Brisbane, QLD: Australian Academic Press, 2011.


When CBT Fails: Using Schema Therapy to Formulate and Overcome Common Roadblocks in Evidence Based Therapy

Workshop Fully Booked

Presenter: Robert Brockman

Workshop Abstract

Whilst CBT enjoys strong empirical support across a large range of psychopathology, a significant proportion of patients show poor treatment response. In many cases, this poor response can be argued to occur due to patient characteristics/traits which make them poor candidates for standard CBT protocols. Recent research has confirmed the status of Schema therapy as an evidence based treatment for a personality disorders using ‘extended schema mode conceptualisations’. Robert will provide a brief outline of recent advances in formulation in Schema Therapy before demonstrating how within-session mode management strategies can be used to overcome common treatment roadblocks to evidence based therapy. This will include an overview of how schema mode formulations can be used to integrate techniques from other evidence based therapies such as ACT, Mindfulness, and Compassion Focused therapies.

Biography

Doctor Robert Brockman is a Lecturer and Psychology Clinic Supervisor on the Clinical Psychology Masters program at the University of Western Sydney. He has extensive clinical experience in both the public and private sector and is accredited by the International Society for Schema Therapy (ISST) as schema therapist, supervisor, and trainer. Robert has a major clinical and research interest in formulation and intervention with complex presentations that prove difficult to treat via standard protocols.


Growing your practice with “e”: how to use online mental health resources and video conferencing

Presenter: Julia Reynolds

Workshop Abstract

Australia is an international leader in developing, researching and providing high quality e-mental health tools. Attention is now turning to how these tools may be integrated into more traditional clinical services and professional practice settings.

This workshop will provide Clinical Psychologists with an understanding of:

1)  The evidence base for online therapies and video-conferencing therapy
2)  Key online resources in Australia
3)  Clinical practice models that incorporate online resources
4)  Practical and ethical issues in the use of online resources and video-conferencing therapy

The presentation will demonstrate key tools and consider their use in case studies. There will be ample opportunity for discussion.

Biography

Julia Reynolds is a Clinical Psychologist with extensive experience in traditional forms of face-to-face service delivery, including public sector service in Australia and the United Kingdom as well as in private practice in Australia.

She is currently the Clinical Services Manager at the Australian National University’s e-hub online mental health service and maintains a small online private practice. Julia is currently the National Health Reform Chair of the College of Clinical Psychologists and co-Convener of the APS e-psychology Interest Group. Julia is leading the Allied Health Team of the national e-Mental Health in Practice (eMHPrac) project.


Improving Outcomes for Work Related and Motor Vehicle Accident Injury

Presenter: Peter Cotton

Workshop Abstract

Health and return to work outcomes for individuals with the same clinical profile are typically worse if the individual has an accepted compensation claim. This session will initially unpack the reasons for these differences in outcomes, and then provide an overview of recent important contextual and intervention-related developments including: the Health Benefits of Work agenda; the National Clinical Framework; Fit Certificates and developments in work-focused psychological treatments. Further, the four main types of psychological injury claims will be delineated as well as specific personality characteristics that impede the effectiveness of standard physical and psychological treatments. This is a vulnerable population and psychological treatment needs to be different than with Medicare clients. The principles of effective treatment with compensable clients will be discussed and participant and presenter case examples reviewed.

Biography

Peter Cotton is a Clinical & Organisational Psychologist specialising in occupational mental health. He works as an advisor to government and the corporate sector. He is currently a Senior Consultant with Medibank Specialist Services Unit and holds workplace mental health advisory appointments with: Comcare Centre for Excellence in Mental Health and Wellbeing at Work; beyondblue and SuperFriend. Peter has consulted with most Australian workers compensation authorities and was an invited workers compensation subject matter expert at the 2010 Australian National Pain Summit. He has also been a senior mental health clinician with WorkSafe Victoria over the past ten years, working with the most advanced clinical quality assurance program in Australia, where in excess of 1000 secondary mental health treatment reviews are conducted each year.


Recognising and Repairing Ruptures in CBT

Workshop Fully Booked

Presenter: Monica O Kelly

Workshop Abstract

Cognitive behaviour therapy is an effective treatment for many disorders, yet there are situations where clients fail to benefit from cognitive behaviour therapy treatment. A consistent finding in research indicates that the quality of the therapeutic alliance is one of the strongest predictors of successful outcome across all modalities of therapy. In fact good outcome cases demonstrate less negative interpersonal processes than bad outcome cases. Cognitive behaviour therapy has traditionally focused on therapeutic techniques that have been shown to be efficacious in research studies with little emphasis on the therapeutic alliance. A shift has occurred recently with cognitive behaviour therapists placing increasing emphasis on the alliance and therapeutic relationship. This workshop will address cutting edge advances in cognitive behaviour therapy with a focus on the impact of interpersonal schema on the therapeutic relationship. The different ways that ruptures can be identified and resolved will be explored. The importance of the therapist's experience, being aware of their thoughts and feelings, in working with clients at impasse moments will be explored. This workshop will involve active participation by those attending.

Biography

Dr Monica O’Kelly - B Sc (Hons), Dip Ed, MB Sc, PhD, FAPS (CClin, CEDP) is Director of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Australia. She is also Director of the Australian Institute for Rational Emotive Behaviour Therapy and an adjunct senior lecturer in the School of Psychology and Psychiatry at Monash University.

Monica has trained in Rational Emotive Behaviour Therapy at the Albert Ellis Institute in New York and is an Associate Fellow of the Institute. She has also completed the Extramural Training Program at the Beck Institute in Philadelphia and is a Fellow of the Academy of Cognitive Therapy. Monica is author of the book CBT in Action: A practitioner’s toolkit and has published many articles and chapters in the area of CBT as well as producing demonstration DVDs.

After leaving university, Monica worked as a psychologist with children, adolescents and adults in a variety of government and educational settings before going into private practice. In the thirty years Monica has been working as a psychologist, she has worked with clients suffering a range of problems. She has an interest in helping people rebuild their lives after trauma and childhood abuse. She sees herself as an emotion coach.

Monica has been involved in training therapists in CBT for over twenty years throughout Australia and in New Zealand, Vietnam, Singapore, Malaysia, and Hong Kong. More recently she has trained practitioners in Papua New Guinea. She takes an active learning approach and believes that skills need to be modelled for trainees and that trainees benefit from skills practice.


Treating adult posttraumatic stress in the face of complexity

Presenter: Reginald Nixon

Workshop Abstract

While trauma-focused cognitive-behavioural methods are still one of the front-line recommended treatments for PTSD, clinicians can face a number of challenges in its implementation due to client complexity. Comorbid problems such as substance abuse, anxiety, depression, as well as self-harm and/or emotional regulation difficulties are just a few of these challenges. This workshop will summarise (briefly) the latest treatment evidence that speaks to how best accommodate such issues when treating PTSD. The workshop will have a strong focus on the possible solutions and strategies for managing this complexity with the opportunity for some discussion of relevant cases from the audience.

Biography

Reg is a clinical psychologist and researcher in the School of Psychology, Flinders University. He has been involved in the treatment and research of trauma for the past 16 years. He has received a number of grants with colleagues, with major grants being awarded by the Australian Research Council, the Australian Rotary Health Research Fund, and the National Health and Medical Research Council. In recent years he has been working with colleagues at the Australian Centre for Posttraumatic Mental Health on the dissemination of Cognitive Processing Therapy, an evidence-based PTSD treatment to organisations such as the Department of Veterans’ Affairs and the Australian Defence Force. He was a member of the Multidisciplinary Panel for the Australian Guidelines for Treatment of ASD and PTSD in Children and Adults (the latest revision of which was published in 2013 by the Australian Centre for Posttraumatic Mental Health and NHMRC) and he is currently an Associate Editor of the journal Behavior Therapy. He has over 64 peer-reviewed journal publications.


Developing Emotional Competence in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Emotion-based Social Skills Training

Workshop Fully Booked

Presenter: Belinda Ratcliffe

Workshop Abstract

Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are at significantly increased risk of mental health issues, compared to typically developing children. Emotion-based Social Skills Training (EBSST) is a treatment program developed and researched by the Children’s Hospital at Westmead since 2004 that aims to promote mental health and well-being in children with ASD by developing social-emotional skills. EBSST focuses on children with ASD aged 8-12 years old developing skills in understanding their own and others’ emotions and emotional regulation. Parents and teachers of children with ASD are taught skills to be emotion coaches in order to foster generalisation and maintenance of skills. EBSST has been evaluated in school-based controlled trials involving over 300 children with ASD, their parents and teachers, with results demonstrating improvements in emotional competence immediately following treatment with large effect sizes. Treatment gains were maintained at 6-months follow-up.

This workshop includes didactic teaching and demonstration of therapy content and will cover:

  • An introduction to Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)
  • Understanding social – emotional needs of young people with ASD.
  • Understanding and applying therapeutic strategies to suit the learning needs of young people with ASD using Emotion-Based Social Skills Training as an example.

Biography

Belinda Ratcliffe is a Clinical Psychologist with over 15 years of clinical and research experience in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), Intellectual Disability (ID) and Mental Health. She is currently employed as a Clinical Psychologist at the Children’s Hospital at Westmead, in Sydney, NSW, and also provides a range of clinical and consultancy services as part of her private practice. Belinda is first author of Emotion-based Social Skills Training for Children with ASD and Mild ID. She has published her research in international peer reviewed journals and had her first chapter published in ‘Mental Health of Children and Adolescents with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities’. Belinda regularly present her research on developing emotion and social skills for children with ASD and ID at national and international conferences and regularly delivers training to health, education, and disability professionals. Belinda has a Masters in Clinical Psychology. She is a full Member of the Australian Psychological Society (APS) and the Clinical College of the APS. Belinda was awarded an Australian Postgraduate Award and a University of Sydney Merit Award to undertake her PHD at the University of Sydney. She was previously awarded a scholarship under the Mental Health Postgraduate Scholarship Scheme to undertake a Masters of Clinical Psychology. Belinda completed a Bachelor of Science (Psychology) at the University of Sydney where she received First Class Honours and the prestigious University medal.


Treating clinical perfectionism

Presenter: Tracey Wade

Workshop Abstract

Generally in society perfectionism is thought to be a positive characteristic, involving striving to achieve high standards without experiencing negative consequences.  However clinicians are aware that aspects of perfectionism can be associated with negative consequences, leading to a range of problems like anxiety, depression and eating disorders.

This workshop will focus on a model of “clinical perfectionism” which describes people who set extremely high standards for performance, are very concerned over making mistakes, and base self-evaluation on how well these standards are met.

This practical workshop will provide information on assessment and collaborative case formulation and therapeutic pitfalls to avoid with this population, as well as presenting a range of specific cognitive behavioural techniques that can be incorporated into an individualized treatment plan. This treatment is evidence-based and has been found to not only reduce perfectionism, but also reduce a range of psychopathology despite the symptoms not being targeted directly in treatment. As such, the approach outlined is appropriate for many clients seen in clinical practice who have elevated perfectionism and a range of different disorders.

This workshop is appropriate for clinicians from a range of professions, and will be useful for the beginning level clinician and those enrolled in graduate training programs, through to clinicians with many years of experience who may struggle with a lack of available guidance in the treatment literature about how to approach the numerous clients they see where perfectionism is a large part of the presenting problem.

Biography

Tracey Wade completed a Masters of Clinical Psychology at the Australian National University in 1992, a PhD at Flinders University in 1998, and a post-doctoral fellowship in the USA during 1999 at the Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioural Genetics.  In 2000 she was awarded the Ian M Campbell memorial prize for outstanding contribution to the scientific or professional status of Clinical Psychology in Australia, and in 2003 she was awarded the Australian Psychological Society Early Career Award.  Since 2001 she has been chief investigator on 5 NHMRC grants. Her research interests are in the aetiology (including genetic and environmental risk factors), prevention and treatment of eating disorders and perfectionism with over 130 publications in peer reviewed journals. She continues to treat people with eating disorders as part of funded research treatment trials.