APS College of Clinical Psychologists

2017 Clinical Conference Program

Key Program Times

Friday 30 June 2017
8.45am - 10.30am:

Conference opening ceremony
VIP Address - John-Paul Langbroek MP and Keynote - Stan Tatkin

11.00am - 6.30pm: Full day workshops
1.00pm - 1.45pm: Lunch time session
Private Practice standards: Future compliance and accreditation requirements for psychologists | Presented by Louise Roufeil
6.30pm - 8.30pm: Welcome Reception
Saturday 1 July 2017
8.30am - 9.30am:   Keynote - Carla Sharp
9.30am - 5.30pm: Full day workshops
9.30am - 1.00pm: Morning half day workshops
2.00pm - 5.30pm: Afternoon half day workshops
7.30pm - 11.00pm: Conference Dinner - Customs House
Sunday 2 July 2017
8.30am - 9.45am: Conference closing ceremony and Keynote - Peter Norton
10.15am - 2.15pm:    Half day workshops
2.30pm - 3.30pm:    APS College of Clinical Psychologists National AGM

Click here to view the program grid


Friday 30 June 2017

Full day workshops: 11am - 6.30pm

Saturday 1 July 2017

Full day workshops: 9.30am - 5.30pm

Half day morning workshops: 9.30am - 1pm

Half day afternoon workshops: 2pm - 5.30pm

Sunday 2 July 2017

Half day workshops: 10.15am - 2.15pm


Full day workshop # 1: Transdiagnostic approaches in the treatment in anxiety and emotional disorders

Presenter: Peter Norton (Monash University)

This workshop is an evidence-based CBT training for clinical psychologists and other mental health professionals and students in transdiagnostic CBT for anxiety and emotional disorders. The “transdiagnostic” approach is gaining widespread acceptance because it enables therapists to treat a variety of emotional disorders, including anxiety, OCD, PTSD, and depressive disorders, using a single treatment approach that targets the common processes underlying and maintaining the disorders. Transdiagnostic CBT has also shown to be particularly effective in treating complex comorbid presentations, by focusing on common underlying factors rather than diagnosis-specific features. Training will focus specifically on transdiagnostic case conceptualisation and the delivery of Transdiagnostic CBT, with an emphasis on Cognitive Restructuring (Thought Challenging) and Emotional Exposure.

Professional development hours: 6

Learning outcomes:

Upon completion of this workshop participants will be able to:

  • understand the basic strategies involved in providing transdiagnostic CBT for anxiety and emotional Disorders.
  • understand the understand the issues and approaches to treating anxiety and emotional disorders from a transdiagnostic framework.
  • be able to begin implementing transdiagnostic CBT

Workshop content:

  • Transdiagnostic case conceptualisation
  • Transdiagnostic cognitive-behavioural CBT
  • Implementing ‘emotional exposure’ for emotional disorders
  • Working with comorbid and complex cases

Audience:

  • Clinical psychologists
  • Provisional psychologists/postgraduate clinical psychology students
  • Other mental health professionals

Full day workshop # 2: The third wave: Excellent outcomes in the private practice free markert

Presenters: Aaron Frost (Benchmark Psychology) and Kaye Frankcom (Kaye Frankcom & Associates)

Private practice is now the preferred option for many psychologists but what does it take to do it well? How do you ensure the clinical standards you set for yourself serve the client, the referrer, your budget and administration requirements? This is a not a one size fits all workshop but will present information on the key ingredients in getting the best outcomes in a private practice setting, as well as exploring the practical limitations in doing so, and how these can be overcome. 

While, the workshop will focus on the practical side of running a great private practice, the emphasis will also be on getting great outcomes for clients. The presenters will share their experiences in the systems and processes they have used to ensure that the highest standards of clinical service are delivered to clients.

Professional development hours: 6

Learning outcomes:

Upon completion of this workshop participants will be able to:

  • Knowledge of key benchmarks for clinical effectiveness
  • Knowledge of systems to improve personal performance
  • Knowledge of evidence based strategies to improve performance with individual clinicians
  • Skills in reading outcome data for clinical decision making
  • Skills in seeking client feedback in session
  • Skills for seeking client feedback after therapy
  • Skills for team building
  • Ideas for building a culture of excellence in their team
  • Skills for supervising therapists using data for individual cases
  • Skills for supervising therapists using whole of caseload data

Workshop content:

  • Theory and evidence of excellence: workshop participants will be introduced to the theoretical underpinnings of the excellent literature, ranging from the work on deliberative practice, cumulative advantage and feedback by K Anders Ericson, through to the mindset literature as an important mediator by Dweck. Finally, participants will be introduced to the growing body of literature of these theories applied to psychotherapy, particularly the work of Chow.
  • Culture of feedback; workshop participants will be guided through the practical steps of applying these theoretical underpinnings to a private practice setting, and given practical tools for creating an excellence drive outcome focussed team of psychologists
  • Outcome Tracking, participants will be introduced to the practicalities of tracking outcomes and seeking client feedback. This section will be agnostic in terms of the model used, covering the Miller, Lambert and IAPT protocols superficially, but focussing on the underlying similarities of all approaches.
  • Supervision; Both Kaye and Aaron are PBA accredited supervisor trainers, and both do masterclasses on using outcomes in supervision. Workshop participants will learn how to supervise individual cases using data, identify worrying signal patterns from outcome tracking and learning how to identify overall patterns of success and failure within individual clinician datasets.

Audience:

This workshop will assume a high skill level and is targeting at experienced practitioners including supervisors. The ideas discussed will be of most interest to those running private practices, but broader themes of quality assurance, clinical excellence, reflective practice and sustainability will be of relevance to all clinically practicing psychologists.


 Full day workshop # 3: Brief intervention for alcohol misuse using imagery

 Presenter: David Kavanagh (Queensland University of Technology)

Intense desires typically involve vivid multisensory mental images and related physical sensations. When these images are focused on drinking, they present significant challenges to control.

This workshop aims to review the evidence on brief interventions and on the role of imagery in motivation. It teaches participants to elicit competing images to strengthen motivation for abstinence or controlled consumption, and help clients use those images in their everyday life. Participants will practise applying the approach to themselves, and role-playing clients they have seen. They will also have an opportunity to download and practise using an app that supports imagery rehearsal and tracks goal attainment, and to become familiar with the assessment of alcohol craving and motivation for control.

Professional development hours: 6

Learning outcomes:

Upon completion of this workshop participants will be able to:

  • Know key features or alcohol intoxication, withdrawal, risks and dependence features.
  • Appreciate the nature and empirical basis of brief interventions for alcohol misuse.
  • Understand the conceptual and empirical basis of Functional Imagery Training
  • Appreciate the motivational power of imagery by applying it to a personal goal
  • Apply motivational interviewing using imagery
  • Train clients to self-regulate alcohol consumption using imagery
  • Use a smartphone app to support the intervention
  • Modify imagery training for different client groups.

Workshop content:

  • Brief review of alcohol intoxication, withdrawal, risks, and dependence features.
  • Brief review of the nature and empirical basis of brief interventions for alcohol misuse.
  • Demonstration of a brief intervention using assessment feedback and advice.
  • Review of the theoretical and empirical underpinnings and key elements of Functional Imagery Training
  • Video demonstration of imagery-based motivational imagery for dietary control 
  • Assisted application of motivational imagery to a personal goal
  • Demonstration of eliciting motivation for alcohol control using imagery
  • Practice of eliciting motivation for alcohol control using imagery
  • Video demonstration of training a client to use imagery-based motivational imagery for dietary control 
  • Practice of training clients to use imagery for self-regulation
  • Demonstration and practice in using a smartphone app to support the intervention
  • Application to client challenges including limited imagery awareness and cognitive deficits.

Audience:

Assumes knowledge and skills in psychological assessment and treatment, and a basic knowledge of motivational interviewing. Participants should be clinical psychologists or be undertaking postgraduate training in clinical psychology.


Full day workshop # 4: CBT for adolescents and adults with ASD level 1 (Asperger's syndrome) and depressions

 Presenters: Tony Attwood and Michelle Garnett (The Hearts and Minds Clinic)

To outline the reasons why there is an association between ASD and depression, modifications needed for individual and group CBT programmes to accommodate the profile of abilities and experiences associated with ASD, and describe a new CBT programme that has been developed and evaluated in Queensland.

Professional development hours: 6

Learning outcomes:

Upon completion of this workshop participants will be able to:

  • Identify the causes of depression in clients with an ASD Level 1 (Asperger’s syndrome)
  • Make necessary adaptations to psychological treatment based on the diagnostic criteria, cognitive profile and life experiences of a client with an ASD
  • Learn new strategies and techniques based on the extensive clinical experience of the presenters

Workshop content:

  • Understanding depression and its relationship to ASD
  • The perception, learning and thinking styles associated with ASD
  • Reasons why those with an ASD can develop signs of depression
  • A ten stage CBT programme with information on each stage
  • Evaluation of the programme via an RCT intervention

Audience:

The workshop would be of value to clinical psychologists and colleagues at all levels of experience and from a wide range of specialization. There is a high level of dual diagnosis of ASD and many psychiatric conditions and personality disorders. This can include services for developmental disorders, disorders of mood, eating, and gender identity, psychosis, alcohol and drug dependency and Borderline Personality Disorder. Some of the therapy activities, such as Energy Accounting will be applicable to CBT for depression in a ranges of clinical groups.


 

Full day workshop # 5: The method of levels: A transdiagnostic approach to increasing the efficiency and impact of CBT

Presenter: Tim Carey (Centre for Remote Health)

The ultimate purpose of the workshop is to provide participants with the ability to use MOL in routine clinical practice. Achieving this purpose will entail providing a compelling rationale for MOL, an explanation of the theoretical principles underpinning MOL, ample time for practice of the techniques, and a description of the evidence supporting MOL. As a flexible, responsive, and patient-perspective transdiagnostic cognitive therapy, MOL is ideally suited to the complexities of routine clinical practice where disorder specific treatments are often difficult to apply due to the problems of comorbidities and variable rates of patient attendance.

Professional development hours: 6

Learning outcomes:

Upon completion of this workshop participants will be able to:

  • Examine their own implicit models of therapeutic change;
  • Learn techniques to promote the participation and engagement of patients;
  • Explore the problem solving process of psychological reorganisation and how best to promote it;
  • Trouble-shoot ways of addressing and overcoming common problems in therapy such as poor engagement and motivation;
  • Develop ways of delivering cognitive therapy flexibly and adaptively using transdiagnostic methods to ensure each patient receives the optimum amount of therapy; and
  • Consider the evidence for MOL.

Workshop content:

  • Identify important components of effective therapy
  • Rationale for curious questioning
  • Demonstration of MOL
  • Description of theoretical principles
  • Practice of MOL techniques

Audience:

The workshop would be suited to a broad range of registered psychologists who are primarily involved in the delivery of psychological treatment to different adolescent and adult client groups. The workshop has been successfully delivered to registered psychologists, psychiatrists, CBT therapists, as well as postgraduate psychology students. It is desirable if participants have a sound working knowledge of CBT and other evidence-based therapies as well as experience delivering these therapies in routine clinical practice. MOL is broadly applicable so psychologists working in a range of different settings where psychological treatments are delivered will find the workshop relevant.


Full day workshop # 6: Writing and defending expert reports in the family and children's court

 Presenters: Christopher Lennings and Alison O'Neill (LSC Psychology)

The workshop is to provide skills and knowledge to professionals engaged in writing expert reports in the Family and Children’s Court. The workshop encompasses the duty of the psychologist as defined by the relevant Expert Codes of conduct, a brief review of literature on best practice, a discussion of appropriate data collection (including structured interviews and psychometrics), discussion of key issues of interest to the Court including assessment of mental health as it impacts on parenting capacity, and domestic violence, as well as risk assessment approaches for allegations of child abuse; and substance abuse issues. The workshop considers the development of an expert report and how to structure it, protocols for undertaking assessment and observations, and defending the report when called to court. Finally, given the inevitability of complaints against clinicians who work frequently in this arena, discussion around handling complaints and social media attacks on reputation will occur.

Professional development hours: 6

Learning outcomes:

Upon completion of this workshop participants will be able to:

  • To be aware of the requirement for undertaking parenting assessments in Federal and State Courts and the appropriate ethical and professional guides.
  • To be aware of various models of appropriate family function
  • To understand the role attachment and bonding play in parenting assessments.
  • To understand the key issues involved in assessing parental competence such as parenting ability, parenting attitudes and child vulnerability factors
  • To implement a comprehensive assessment process in assessing parental competence
  • To be aware of the appropriate psychometric measures for assessing parenting competence.
  • To be able to construct an adequate parenting competence assessment report.
  • Appreciate what are the necessary risk factors that need to be assessed and considered within a child protection and family assessment report
  • Gain an understanding of a model to understand child risk abuse assessments in the absence of criminal court findings.
  • To gain skill in defending reports in court and engaging in cross examination

Audience:

The target audience would primarily be clinical practitioners (Psychologists, social workers, psychiatrists and other mental health workers in the Family and Children’s court system); clinical psychologists and social workers in mental health working with families, and post graduate students in Forensic and Clinical Masters/Doctorate programs.Attendees should have developed skills in the interviewing of adults and children, and preferably some understanding of attachment theory and family dynamics. They should have competence in the use of psychometric measures, be skilled in interviewing and taking a comprehensive history, and be adaptable in tailoring their manner when dealing with children.


Full day workshop # 7: Is it all in my head? Understanding and treating functional neurological disorder

Presenter: Michelle Riashi (St George Hospital, SESLHD)

Functional Neurological Disorder (FND), also commonly referred to as conversion disorder, medically unexplained symptoms or psychogenic illness, exemplifies the way that the brain and mind are truly integrated as one. Yet, within a medical system that is often still dualistic in nature, these patients can feel dismissed and their treating doctors and therapists overwhelmed and unsure how to proceed. This workshop will aim to improve participants understanding of FND – it will explore common diagnostic issues, recent research findings and contemporary theoretical models of FND. It will also outline evidence-based assessment and treatment guidelines, along with common ethical considerations.

Professional development hours: 6

Learning outcomes:

Upon completion of this workshop participants will be able to:

  • Describe what ‘functional’ means and the diagnostic criteria for FND.
  • Describe how to assess for FND.
  • Knowledge of contemporary theories of FND, including recent advances in neuroscientific models.
  • Describe how to discuss diagnosis with patients.
  • Ability to complete case formulations and how to present these to FND patients.
  • Discuss the implications for treatment of the different subtypes of FND.

Workshop content:

  • Overview of FND, including DSM5 diagnostic criteria.
  • Overview of assessment process, including information on ‘positive signs’ of FND and useful measures.
  • Differential diagnostic considerations.
  • Overview of recent evidence base and contemporary theories of FND, particularly attachment and neuroscientific models and research
  • Overview of biopsychosocial model of FND and strategies on how to present this to patients.
  • Evidence-based treatment for FND and how that may differ between subtypes, specifically functional movement disorders and non-epileptic seizures.
  • Clinical and ethical considerations

Audience:

This workshop would be suitable for clinical psychologists working with adults and with minimal to moderate experience working with FND patients. It should be of interest to not only those working within health psychology settings but also to those in public mental health services and private practice, as these patients will often be referred to a diverse range of services in order to access a diagnosis or suitable treatment.


Full day workshop # 8: Complex challenges in clinical psychotherapy practice: Obstacles or opportunities?

Presenter: Wendy Crouch (Private Practice)

This workshop present ways of constructively and creatively thinking about complex psychotherapeutic challenges and dilemmas in clinical practice. Challenges such as: initial engagement difficulties, empathic failure, therapeutic ruptures, facing limitations, and “good enough” endings, will be considered. In making the argument for welcoming challenges as opportunities for enhancement of therapeutic outcomes, rather than obstacles to such, background theoretical discussion on concepts from attachment,developmental, and psychodynamic theories will be interwoven with clinical vignettes and illustrative examples from the arts and poetry. Participants will be encouraged to reflect on their own clinical work in a way that facilitates emotional growth in themselves, their clients/patients, and the therapeutic relationship.  During the workshop there will be opportunities for participants to individually reflect on their own clinical practice as well as small and large group interactive tasks and discussion. An extensive reference list will be distributed.

Professional development hours: 6

Learning outcomes:

Upon completion of this workshop participants will be able to:

  • Developed an enhanced awareness of potential challenges in their clinical practice, and welcome them as opportunities for therapeutic growth
  • Extended their repertoire of clinical skills, including the use of therapeutic imagination, in negotiating clinical challenges and using them constructively to contribute to positive therapeutic outcomes
  • A greater trust in their capacity to think and reflect during the therapeutic encounter
  • Increased their knowledge and understanding of potentially helpful rich theoretical resources for thinking about challenges in their clinical practice.

Workshop content:

  • Discussion on what therapy is about and what are its goals.
  • A reflection on what causes difficulties for us as therapists.
  • Presentation of a conceptual framework for consideration of challenges and dilemmas: (a) Important therapist qualities (b) Some theoretical background
  • An exploration of challenges/dilemmas at specific points of the therapeutic process
  • Summary and reflection

Audience:

Participants who would most benefit from this workshop would be those practitioners who have at least five years prior experience in clinical psychotherapy work. Preferably they should be currently engaged in some form of active clinical work and are likely to be working in the disciplines of psychology, social work, or medicine. 


 

Full day workshop # 9: Coping skills for clinical practitioners: Early Years through to adolescence

Presenter: Erica Frydenberg (The University of Melbourne)

This workshop will make the links between theory and practice. It will review the major theories and language that can be used to both describe the way we cope but also to enhance our coping skills. The workshop will draw on measurement tools such as the Early Years Coping Cards, Adolescent Coping Scale-2 and the Coping Scale for Adults-2. The focus will be on evidence-based constructs which can be utilized in a range of contexts with different populations, both clinical and non-clinical, group or family. A particular feature of this workshop will be the introduction of the on-line version of the ACS-2 and CSA-2. A focus will be on how these measurement tools can be incorporated into individual or group clinical programs or applied as tools of prevention.

Professional development hours: 6

Learning outcomes:

Upon completion of this workshop participants will be able to:

  • Identify and understand key theories in the field of coping
  • Develop a nomenclature of coping
  • Assess coping skills in children, adolescents and adults
  • Consider coping across the lifespan
  • Apply coping concepts to professional practice
  • Utilise a coping skills program for children, adolescents and adults
  • Incorporate coping skills into a parenting program

Workshop content:

  • Following the presentation of the measurement tools, issues around development, validation, reliability and applications for professional practice will be considered. Collectively, these instruments enable both data gathering and interventions to be developed for health, wellbeing and success.
  • Participants will be encouraged to consider how the constructs may be utilized in their professional research and/or practice as a way of identifying and building resilience.
  • How these tools can be incorporated into parenting programs will be illustrated with the Coping Scale for Adults-2 and the Early Years Coping cards.

Audience:

  • Practitioners and/or researchers who want to utilise the coping constructs in their research and practice.
  • Coping has application possibilities in clinical practice psychologists; social workers or medical practitioners would find this suitable.
  • Prior knowledge of psychometrics is not a prerequisite but helpful

Full day workshop # 10: HYPE: A cognitive analytic therapy informed early intervention for borderline personality disorder programme

Presenters: Louise McCutcheon and Andrew Chanen (Orygen)

Although borderline personality disorder (BPD) usually has its onset in young people, its diagnosis and treatment is often delayed. Over the past 2 decades, there has been a rapid increase in evidence showing that BPD can be diagnosed in young people and that it is continuous with BPD in adults. This workshop will cover the current evidence about borderline personality disorder (BPD) in young people, and present a best practice model of early intervention for young people with BPD and associated problems.

Professional development hours: 6

Learning outcomes:

Upon completion of this workshop participants will be able to:

  • Understand the principles and evidence for Early Intervention for BPD
  • Provide an overview of the HYPE program, as an example of an early intervention program for BPD
  • Discuss screening and assessment of BPD in young people
  • Cover the essentials of psychoeducation about BPD in young people
  • Provide sources and materials for further information about BPD
  • Provide a brief introduction to a relational model (Cognitive Analytic Therapy, CAT), that can assist in working collaboratively with young people with BPD

 Workshop content:

  • Rationale for early intervention for borderline personality disorder (BPD)
  • Assessment of BPD
  • Principles of early intervention for BPD
  • HYPE: an example of an early intervention program for BPD
  • Introduction to cognitive analytic therapy
  • Theoretical origins of the model
  • Core concepts of CAT, and CAT model of BPD
  • Case example CAT intervention with young adult

Audience:

Most mental health clinicians work with individuals with personality disorder features, whether they are aware of this or not and even clinicians with considerable experience can find this patient group challenging. Understanding the rationale for and principles of early intervention can assist clinicians to meet the needs of people with BPD more effectively. This workshop is suitable for advanced practitioners with considerable experience with children, adolescents and adults as well as those with a basic level of experience and training working outside mental health. Opportunities will be made for interactive discussion tailored to participants’ level of experience.


Full day workshop # 11: Understanding and treating individuals with narcisstic personality disorder and those they affect

Presenter: Ross King (Deakin University)

This workshop is intended for practitioners working in a broad range of clinical settings with adults who present with personality disorders and other psychological disorders (e.g., anxiety, depression). It is also suitable for those practitioners who see clients who present with a broad range of issues as a result of interactions with narcissistic parents, partners or employers. Through didactic presentations, video demonstrations and exercises, participants will develop knowledge and skills in managing therapeutic relationship as well skills in CBT and Schema-Focused Therapy interventions for narcissistic personality disorder as well as strategies to assist those affected by them.

Professional development hours: 6

Learning outcomes:

Upon completion of this workshop participants will be able to:

  • Develop knowledge regarding narcissism in modern society, its manifestation in social media and culture, the reasons of its apparent rise, and nurturing healthy narcissism;
  • Develop knowledge regarding the features, subtypes and conceptualisation of narcissism and narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) both theoretically and within the major diagnostic systems (DSM-5 and ICD);
  • Identify and diagnose narcissistic personality disorder, differentiate it from other disorders, and assess for comorbid conditions;
  • Develop skills in general therapeutic engagement and management of NPD clients, including managing therapist countertransference;
  • Develop knowledge and skills in implementation of CBT approach to treating NPD into participants’ clinical practice;
  • Develop knowledge and skills in implementation of schema-focused therapy approach to treating NPD into participants’ clinical practice;
  • Develop skills in working effectively with the victims of narcissistic parents, partners and employers/ employees.

Workshop content:

The workshop will cover:

  • Has there been a rise in narcissism & if so why & how is it reflected in social media usage and other domains;
  • Is there such a thing as healthy narcissism and what can we do to nurture this in children;
  • The theoretical perspectives on narcissism and narcissistic personality disorder, including subtypes of narcissism
  • Narcissistic personality disorder in DSM-5 and ICD-10/11
  • The assessment and diagnosis of NPD, including differential diagnosis and comorbidity
  • Why do those with NPD present for treatment, therapeutic engagement and management, including therapist countertransference;
  • Theory and practice of CBT for NPD clients;
  • Theory and practice of Schema-Focused Therapy for NPD clients;
  • Working therapeutically with the victims of narcissistic parents, partners, and employers/ employees

Audience:

This workshop is intended for practitioners working in a broad range of clinical settings with adults who present with personality disorders and other psychological disorders (e.g., anxiety, depression). It is also suitable for those practitioners who see clients who present with a broad range of issues as a result of interactions with narcissistic parents, partners or employers.


Full day workshop # 12: Advanced process skills in supervision
FULLY BOOKED

 Presenter: Analise O’Donovan (Griffith University)

*This workshop is only suitable for registered supervisors*

 

This workshop is being run in conjunction with Griffith University for the 2017 APS College of Clinical Psychologists Conference.

To enhance supervisors understanding about supervisee resistance, and to provide them with tools to manage this. All supervisees have some resistance to supervision, but at times this can be detrimental to effective supervision and consequently to their clients. The workshop will also aim to assist supervisors in reflecting on their own resistance (e.g. to providing constructive, timely feedback) and consider their own role in resistance being a part of the supervisory alliance.

Professional development hours: 6

Workshop content:

The workshop will cover:

  • What is Resistance? Definitions, discussion on defense mechanisms, coping styles, the difference between resistance and reactance,
  • Understanding supervisee resistance: What increases resistance? What decreases resistance? Understanding the role of the supervisor in supervisee resistance. Will explore range of areas including attachment issues, the role of shame, avoiding responsibility, testing behaviours,
  • Signs of supervisee resistance,
  • The consequences of resistance, e.g. supervisee lack of disclosure, risks to clients,
  • The role of the supervisor, including supervisory avoidance, reflection of what types of behaviours increase risk of supervisor’s reactance,
  • Best ways to address resistance, including the importance of the supervisors alliance, working with supervisee emotions, boundary issues in supervision, restorative functions of supervision, working toward genuine collaboration.

Full day workshop # 14: Reviewing the role of genetics in psychological traits and psychiatric disorders

Presenters: Sarah Medland, Penny Lind, Lucia Colodro Conde and Katrina Grasby (QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute)

Over the past decade, large-scale collaborative projects have significantly increased our knowledge and understanding of the genetic risk factors for mental health conditions. The ideas that genes play a role in the development of mental illness and the awareness that mental illness often runs in families are wide spread within the community. In this workshop we will review the evidence for genetic influences and provide an overview of the methods used to estimate the magnitude of genetic effects and identify genetic variants. We will review the progress in identifying genetic variants influencing psychiatric disorders and discuss ways in which psychologists can respond to clients’ questions about genetic and familial risk.

Professional development hours: 6

Learning outcomes:

Upon completion of this workshop participants will be able to:

  • Gain knowledge of concepts and methods used in the field of genetic epidemiology.
  • Understand the complexities of genetics risk factors for mental health conditions.
  • Be able to review, analyse, and evaluate complex findings from genetic studies of mental health conditions.
  • Make informed judgements regarding findings from genetic studies of mental health conditions.
    Clearly communicate to clients what the complex findings of genetic studies of mental health conditions means for them.

Workshop content:

The workshop will cover:

  • Introduce genetic terminology and concepts
  • Explain the concepts and utility heritability estimates
  • Describe methodologies used in genetic research
  • Contrast the genetic contribution to complex disorders with classic Mendelian disorders
  • Describe the biology and practical meaning of genetic risk and how it is calculated.
  • Discuss the role of the environment in the expression of genetic risk (reviewing classic examples in the field)
  • Discuss possible limitations in research of genetic risk
  • Interpret genetic risk findings for mental health conditions
  • Communicate genetic risk for mental health conditions
  • Explore the ethical implications of discussing genetic and familial risk in clinical practice and the avenues for referring clients to genetic specialist services.

Audience:

The audience will be practitioners who work with mental health clients and/or their families and researchers with an interest in the area. Workshop participants should have a basic understanding of the concepts of inheritance. Knowledge of basic statistical techniques including correlation and regression will be assumed.  


Full day workshop # 15: Borderline personality disorder in adolescents: Assessment, diagnosis and treatment

Presenter: Carla Sharp (University of Houston)

Despite the fact that the diagnosis of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) in youth is legitimized in psychiatric nomenclature (DSM 5 and the ICD-11) as well as national treatment guidelines in the United Kingdom and Australia, BPD is not routinely assessed for or treated in most child and mental health services. This workshop will review the existing evidence base for BPD in adolescents, followed a discussion and demonstration of evidence-based approaches to the assessment and treatment of BPD in adolescents, with a specific focus on the mentalization-based approach.

Professional development hours: 6

Learning outcomes:

Upon completion of this workshop participants will be able to:

  • Understand the barriers (myths) regarding early detection and intervention of BPD in adolescents.
  • Appreciate the evidence in support of the borderline diagnosis in youth.
  • Know the key developmental theories on the development of BPD.
  • Understand the focus on mentalization as malleable treatment target in BPD.
  • Be able to assess borderline features and mentalization in youth.
  • Understand the basic components of Mentalization-based Treatment (MBT)  for BPD in youth.

Workshop content:

  • Review evidence addressing the barriers (myths) regarding early detection and intervention of BPD in adolescents.
  • Review key developmental theories on the development of BPD, to include mentalization-based theory and biosocial theory.
  • Review the empirical evidence in support of a mentalization-based conceptualization of BPD.
  • Review and demonstrate tools and approaches for the assessment borderline features in youth.
  • Review and demonstrate assessment tools and approaches for the assessment of mentalization impairment in youth.
  • Review and demonstration of the basic components of Mentalizaiton-based Treatment for BPD in youth.
  • Practice of using mentalization-based techniques in psychotherapy.

Audience:

The workshop would be of interest to clinical psychologists at all levels of experience and from a wide range of specialization. Those wishing to include a focus on maladaptive personality function into their work with youngsters will benefit in particular from this workshop, in addition to those interested in integrating a mentalization-based focus into their current practice.


Full day workshop # 16: An introduction to a psychobiological approach to couple therapy: Attachment, arousal regulation and neuroscience

Presenter: Stan Tatkin (The PACT Insitute)

PACT is a poly-theoretical, non-linear approach that combines fusion of attachment theory, developmental neuroscience, and arousal regulation. It is quickly gaining a reputation for effectively treating couples typically thought of as untreatable.

PACT focuses on early attachment and its effect on brain and nervous system development, as well as on specific neuroendocrine issues related to interpersonal stress. The PACT methodology emphasizes enactment of experience over cognition or psychological interpretation. Interventions often entail therapeutically staged moments intended to trigger arousal and implicit somatoaffective experience and memory. PACT training enables clinicians to discover and analyse psychobiological cues, or “tells,” and other bottom-up (implicit) processes that reveal what top-down (explicit) approaches cannot.

This 6-hour introduction to A Psychobiological Approach to Couple Therapy® gives an overview of the principles behind PACT through a combination of lecture, experiential exercises, demonstrations, and videos.  Clinicians who want to deepen their knowledge of attachment, arousal regulation, neurobiological development, and therapeutic enactments should attend this seminar. The presentation moves at a vigorous, entertaining clip and never fails to influence and inspire clinicians who love working with couples.

Professional development hours: 6

Level of learning activity: Intermediate and Advanced

Learning outcomes:

Upon completion of this workshop participants will be able to:

  1. Describe critical developmental periods for the three domains of PACT.
  2. Differentiate between autoregulation, external regulation, self-regulation, and interactive regulation.
  3. Apply at least three tools for discovering attachment organization within and between partners.
  4. List and describe at least three principles of secure functioning.
  5. Apply at least one sign of a therapeutic alliance with a couple. 
  6. Describe at least two ways a PACT therapist engages the couple.

Workshop content:

  • Warming up to a poly-theoretical, non-linear approach
  • What defines a capacity model versus a conflict model of therapy
  • Forensic-type interview techniques
  • Developmental factors influencing early attachment, arousal regulation, and neurobiological integration of social-emotional structures
  • Bottom-up versus top-down interventions
  • Therapist self-regulation
  • Reading microexpressions and micromovements
  • Understanding and reading behavioural “tells”
  • Differentiating secure functioning from secure attachment
  • The importance of therapeutic stance (secure functioning)
  • The use of strategic interventions

Audience:

  • Clinical Neuropsychologists, Psychologists in other disciplines, Allied Health Professionals interested in the evidence and application of psychobiological techniques to their clinical practice
  • Researchers and academics interested in psychobiological intervention
  • Psychology students interested in psychobiological interview techniques that yield accurate information more quickly

Full day workshop # 17: Psychological management of migraine and tension-type headache

Presenter: Paul Martin (Griffith University)

Psychological approaches to the treatment of migraine and tension-type headache are more effective than alternatives such as medication and physiotherapy. However, few individuals suffering from headaches are referred to psychologists for treatment. This reflects that most medical practitioners are not aware of the efficacy of psychological approaches but also that few psychologists have been trained in the assessment and treatment of headaches. This workshop is part of a long-term plan to train the psychology work force to reduce the burden of headache.

Professional development hours: 6

Learning outcomes:

Upon completion of this workshop participants will be able to:

  • Participants will understand the traditional medical approach to chronic headaches (benign recurring headaches), the diagnostic criteria for migraine and tension-type headache, and danger signs that prompt referral to a neurologist.
  • Participants will understand the functional model of chronic headaches as an alternative to the traditional approach and how it can be used for guiding psychological assessment and treatment.
  • Participants will have acquired knowledge of the headache research literature.
  • Participants will have learnt general assessment methods and more specialised assessment methods, and when it is appropriate to use them.
  • Participants will have learnt how to carry out treatment methods.

Workshop content:

The workshop will cover:

  • The content of the workshop will include a discussion of the relevant research literature, presentation of a model to guide assessment and treatment, description of assessment techniques and treatment techniques.
  • Case studies will be used to illustrate the approach.
  • Each section of the workshop will involve discussion between the participants and presenter.
  • As the presenter has 40 years of experience in the headache domain, as a researcher, clinician and educator, he is in a good position to vary the workshop according to the wishes of the participants. For example, a greater focus on children if that is what the participants would like. If even some of the participants have experience treating headaches or a cognate disorder such as chronic pain, then the experience of these participants can be incorporated into the workshop.

Audience:

This workshop is intended to provide learning with respect to how to assess and treat the common primary headaches, that is, migraine and tension-type headache. The workshop assumes that participants have training and experience in cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). Hence, it is suitable for clinical and health psychologists, and other psychologists who have had training in CBT.


Half day workshop # 1: Culture centered therapy with Australian Indigenous people

Presenter: Carmen Cubillo (Charles Darwin University)

Mini abstract to be provided

Professional development hours: 3

Learning outcomes:

Upon completion of this workshop participants will be able to:

  • To better understand Aboriginal history within a mental health context
  • Understand inherited core beliefs in aboriginal people
  • Develop participants own personal way in working with aboriginal people
  • Develop pathways in participants practice to overcome barriers in working with aboriginal people
  • Increase advocacy for indigenous mental health issues.

Workshop content:

The workshop will cover:

  • Treatment of aboriginal history and what that means for mental health
  • CBT model for aboriginal people, what it might look like in an ecosystemic context and what barriers that proposes for therapy
  • Strategies for therapists to build their own cultural competency model in dealing with aboriginal clients

Half day workshop # 2: The supervisor perspective: Therapist behaviours that have the biggest impact on therapy outcome

Presenter: Matthew Smout (Centre for Treatment of Anxiety and Depression)

Although the modern psychotherapist gains exposure to a plethora of exotic theories and creative interventions, oftentimes the success of a course of therapy rests on the therapist’s mastery of fundamental interpersonal, time-management and self-management skills.  This workshop invites participants to analyse their current habits of structuring and delivering cognitive behaviour therapy (including third-wave variants) of adult clients and provides evidence-based recommendations for refining their practice.  The presenter draws on 16 years of clinical practice (12 as a supervisor) to highlight the most common conceptual and technical errors and how to correct these. Participants will leave with concrete plans for changes to make to assessment, session plans, and which skills to prioritise developing.

Professional development hours: 3

Learning outcomes:

Upon completion of this workshop participants will be able to:

  • Identify which therapist behaviours best facilitate client progress
  • Identify which therapist behaviours most impede client progress
  • Gain helpful therapist responses (phrases and strategies) when collaboration is disrupted
  • Knowledge of empirical research that supports these refinements to practice.

Workshop content:

The workshop will cover:

  • Before the first session: using pre-treatment data to enhance assessment feedback and negotiate workable goals.
  • Focused assessment: which diagnostic and historical factors have prognostic significance.
  • Refining problem and goal statements: setting the agenda for a course of therapy.
  • Choosing a plan of attack: disorder-focused manualised approaches vs formulation-driven individually-tailored treatment plans.  (Factors that influence these decisions).
  • Structuring the session: according to the client and the treatment plan.
  • Guided discovery v unfocused exploration
  • Learning from experience v persuasion
  • Managing arousal to enable learning
  • Preparing between-session tasks
  • A time for acceptance and a time to re-evaluate your beliefs
  • Imagery rescripting v exposure v behavioural experiments
  • Setting the client up to work without you (forever, to work with someone else, or with you again later).
  • Therapist’s therapy-interfering beliefs and behaviour
  • Structuring your service to optimise outcomes.

Audience:

This workshop is suitable for both beginner therapists, experienced therapists looking to reflect on their practice, and supervisors.  Participants should be familiar with the models and methods of cognitive behaviour therapy, motivational interviewing and acceptance and commitment therapy (or similar approaches).  The workshop is aimed at clinicians working individually with common adult mental health and addiction problems, including chronic anxiety, depression and personality disorders.


Half day workshop # 3: IT for clinical psychologists - contemporary practice technologies and a view to the very near future 

Presenter: Les Posen (Private Practice)

The workshop will focus on current technologies to enable practitioners to so what they’re already doing but more effectively and efficaciously, more safely, and with enhanced patient engagement. But the workshop aims to go beyond that and show new technologies and how they can augment the clinician’s work.

Professional development hours: 3

Learning outcomes:

Upon completion of this workshop participants will be able to:

  • Review and updating of current digital technologies valuable for clinicians
  • How to best understand and come to terms with the changing pace of technology and what it means for clinicians and patients
  • How to know what makes for a great technology
  • How to bring effective technologies into practice with a minimum of fuss
  • An exposure to “What’s just around the corner”, e.g. wearable devices, Internet of Things, augmented and virtual reality hardware and software applied to therapeutic interventions.
  • Hands on demonstrations of technologies in action, how to introduce them to patients, how to keep patients engaged in their use of technologies

Workshop content:

The workshop will cover:

What’s described for learning outcomes will be put into an engaging interactive format where “no one asks a silly question” and all levels of technical capability are welcomed.

Some didactive teaching (no Death by Powerpoint), some demoes, some hands on playing, some group discussion has historically proved the best way to get audiences excited about the content and eager to try things out for themselves

Audience:

The workshop is aimed at clinicians and practitioners in both solo and group practices and in a variety of settings and a diversity of clinical populations

The ability to handle a smartphone or tablet is assumed although past experience in conducting these workshops suggest many who initially thought themselves “naïve, ignorant, dinosaurs, technophobic” walk away excited and eager to try out what they witnessed and learnt.


Half day workshop # 17: Adjusting treatment response to meet the needs of people with chronic depression

Presenter: Christopher Lee

It appears that there are distinct types of depression.  Some people experience a single episode of depression which often responds well to a variety of treatments.

The second type of depression is more chronic.  The people who experience this disorder are less likely to respond to standard treatments and are much more likely to show a chronic course, ie longer episodes and greater number of episodes.

This workshop examines the evidence for the differences between the two groups and proposes intervention strategies that recognises and specifically addresses these issues.

Workshop participants will have an opportunity to practice these interventions.

Professional development hours: 3

Learning outcomes:

Upon completion of this workshop participants will be able to:

  • To be able to identify two key processes that differentiate single episode depression from chronic depression.
  • Understand the need for emotion focused approaches to treat chronic depression.
  • Practice strategies designed to assist the two processes known to effect treatment response and severity of depression.

Workshop content:

  • Review the literature on what client factors give rise to chronic forms of depression
  • Review how a focus on key emotional events from childhood will enhance treatment of depression.
  • Learn how to challenged ingrained critical negative thinking with emotion focused techniques

Audience:

This workshop is particularly suitable for people who work with chronic depression.  It targets patient groups that may not typically respond to inter-personal psychotherapy or standard CBT and therefore is more suited to experienced therapists who recognise when these approaches are less likely to succeed in patients with simple depression.


Half day workshop # 4: The fundamentals of compassion-focused therapy

Presenter: Stan Steindl (Psychology Consultants Pty Ltd)

This one-day workshop is designed as an introductory primer for therapists who have an interest in learning about compassion focused therapy (CFT). In particular, the workshop will cover the basic evolutionary model underpinning CFT, the role of affiliative/soothing system in threat regulation, and the multi-component dimensions of compassion. Participants will hear about a range of CFT strategies that work to engage people’s soothing and threat regulation systems, including body and breath focusing, imagery and meditative practices, writing and behavioural work. Central to this approach is the role of compassion and the development and activation of the "compassionate self" to contain and work with threat-based emotions, such as fear and anxiety, anger, sadness, self-criticism and shame.

Professional development hours: 3

Learning outcomes:

Upon completion of this workshop participants will be able to:

  • Introduction to the evolutionary model of human psychology
  • Understanding an evolutionary approach to emotion, behaviour and motivations
  • The role of attachment in emotion regulation and the development of the compassionate self
  • The two psychologies of compassion and its constituent elements
  • The link between compassion and care-giving and receiving motivational systems
  • Practices that cultivate compassion and build a sense of the compassionate self

 

Half day workshop # 5: A stepped care model of smoking cessation: The pivotal role of psychology

Presenters: Donita Baird and Cathy Segan (QUIT Victoria)

Recent research demonstrates that quitting smoking for at least six weeks is associated with reduced depression, anxiety and stress and improved quality of life for smokers both with and without mental illness. While tobacco smoking rates are approximately 2-4 times higher among people with mental illness compared to the general population, smokers with mental illness are just as motivated to quit as general population smokers. Clinical trials show that cessation is achievable in smokers with mental illness with appropriate, tailored support, yet few are offered the opportunity. For example, a survey of psychologists from NSW found that only 13% routinely advised cessation. This workshop will address common concerns about smoking cessation, in particular the impact of nicotine withdrawal on mental health, and will arm psychologists with evidence-based practical strategies to help their clients quit smoking. 

This workshop will present a stepped care model for delivering appropriate, tailored smoking cessation support. Learn how to conduct a smoking cessation brief intervention and maintain your therapeutic alliance. Learn more intensive strategies for clients having difficulty quitting or with complex needs.  Discuss methods of implementing smoking cessation in your practice and in your work setting. You will receive a kit of resources that you can use with your clients.

Professional development hours: 3

Learning outcomes:

Upon completion of this workshop participants will be able to:

  • Understand the interrelation between mental health and smoking.
  • To know the range of smoking cessation treatment options and evidence supporting their use in people with co-morbid mental health conditions.
  • To know how to conduct a brief intervention for smoking cessation
  • To know how to conduct more intensive smoking cessation support
  • To identify strategies to routinely implement smoking cessation into your practice

Workshop content:

  1. Understand the interrelation between mental health and smoking.

1.1   Impact of smoking on the physical health of people with mental illness.

1.2   Impact of smoking, and of smoking cessation, on mental health. For example: Smoking in people with mental illness is associated with more psychiatric symptom; increased hospitalizations and higher required doses of psychiatric medication

1.3   Consumers’ views and experience of smoking cessation

  1. To know the range of smoking cessation treatment options and evidence supporting their use in people with co-morbid mental health conditions

2.1   Overview of smoking cessation in general population

2.2   Evidence for smoking cessation in clients with mental health conditions

  1. To know how to conduct a brief intervention for smoking cessation

3.1   Framework for brief intervention – 3As

3.2   Framework for step two – 5As

3.3   Quitline as a resource

  1. To know how to conduct more intensive smoking cessation support

4.1. To identify clients who may require more tailored smoking cessation support

4.2 Strategies for more intensive smoking cessation support

  1. To identify strategies to implement smoking cessation into your practice

5.1. Identify barriers to implementation

5.2. Examples of implementation Quit has partnered with community mental health organisations, inpatients, prisons.

Audience:

This workshop is for practitioners working with clients who may smoke. It is applicable to all work settings – private, individual, community health service, youth services, aged care, aged psychiatry, adult psychiatry, cardiac rehabilitation, COPD, alcohol and drug services, forensic, inpatient, outpatients.

  • It is suitable all levels of experience.
  • No current or prior knowledge of smoking cessation is required.

Half day workshop # 6: Creating safety whilst working with trauma using emotion-focused therapy (EFT)

Presenter : Melissa Harte (The Heart Felt Centre /The Emotion Focussed Training Centre)

The purpose of this experiential workshop is to provide participants with a working knowledge of issues associated with working with trauma clients. These included identifying dissociation and understanding the concept of dual awareness. It will also provide participants with introductory knowledge and theoretical understanding of the Emotion Focused Therapy model and practice some of the models therapeutic interventions applicable to trauma work. Practical skills include grounding, developing dual awareness as proposed by Barbette Rothschild, developing a safe place to promote self-soothing and simple but effective methods to assist with hyperarousal. 

Professional development hours: 3

Learning outcomes:

Upon completion of this workshop participants will be able to:

  • Develop basic understanding of Emotion Focused Therapy principles of working with trauma
  • Define trauma
  • Identify the presence of trauma
  • Identify dissociation
  • Identify clients readiness for trauma processing
  • How to implement practical skills at appropriate times within therapy
  • Learn grounding techniques to manage hyper arousal 
  • Develop an understanding of dual awareness as proposed by Barbette Rothschild,
  • Develop an understanding of the importance of creating a safe place that promotes self-soothing
  • Learn other simple but effective methods to assist with hyperarousal. 

Workshop content:

This experiential EFT workshop will provide participants with:

  • An introductory knowledge and theoretical understanding of the EFT model
  • An understanding the Importance of attunement
  • A discussion about trauma and its effects
  • EFT and Trauma
  • A model of Trauma processing
  • An introduction to the Highly Sensitive Person Phenomenon
  • An introduction to Focusing for processing traumatic and painful events
  • Opportunities to practice some of the therapeutic interventions applicable to trauma work. Practical skills include grounding, developing dual awareness as proposed by Barbette Rothschild, developing a safe place to promote self-soothing and simple but effective methods to assist with hyperarousal. 

Audience:

This workshop is suitable for fully qualified and student psychologists, counsellors, psychotherapists, social workers, and people working in the mental health industry. Practitioners working in private practice or clinical settings will find this workshop invaluable as it offers simple yet practical ways of dealing with some of the difficulties associated with trauma work. A significant number of adults report being exposed to one or more traumatic event in their lifetimes and child abuse disturbingly common. Working with single event trauma or developmental trauma requires careful consideration around avoiding re-traumatisation and recognising dissociation. Knowing the signs of dissociation and how to deal with it is vital in trauma work.

Practical skills include grounding, developing dual awareness as proposed by Barbette Rothschild, developing a safe place to promote self-soothing and simple but effective methods to assist with hyperarousal.  In addition to the basic principles of working with trauma, a model of trauma processing will be presented. Participants will be able to apply knowledge gained from this workshop and integrate into their work with their trauma and non-trauma clients immediately as no prior knowledge of EFT is required.


 

Half day workshop # 18: Clinical psychologists and mental health digitals technologies - expanding your practice in a reforming health system

Presenter: Julia Reynolds

Clinical psychologists are practising in rapidly changing health systems. Increasingly clients, referrers and funders expect clinical psychologists to understand advice upon and use high quality e-mental health (e-MH) resources and digital technologies in their practice - both in delivering their own therapy and in overseeing the delivery of lower intensity interventions by other workers.

This workshop is designed for clinical psychologists in clinical practice. It will provide practical skills and knowledge so they can:

1)      Assess and manage their clients’ spontaneous use of e-MH

2)      Incorporate e-MH resources into their clinical practice safely and ethically. It is expected that the APS Clinical Guidelines for e-MH will have been launched and will be considered in the workshop

3)      Understand how these tool can be incorporated into stepped care systems

The workshop will provide opportunities for case discussion and interaction with key Australian e-MH services.

Professional development hours: 3

Learning outcomes:

Upon completion of this workshop participants will be able to:

  • Explain the context in which e-MH has developed, its importance for psychologists and its role in reform including stepped care systems
  • Identify the key quality and safety indicators for e-MH resources and evaluate whether particular resources are suitable for use in their practice
  • Identify the potential risks associated with clients’ unguided use of e-MH and develop strategies for assessing and managing their risks
  • Identify models of clinical practice that incorporate e-MH, decide which models will be most relevant for their practice
  • Identify key ethical and practical considerations
  • Develop strategies for implementing e-MH in their practice

Workshop content:

  • Definition of e-MH types, purpose and context
  • Assessment and management of potentially risky uses of e-MH by clients
  • Evaluation of safety, quality and suitability of e-MH resources for participants’ particular work setting
  • Development of strategies and procedures for monitoring and mitigating key ethical and practical issues in implementing e-MH 

Audience:

The workshop will be practical and designed for clinical psychologists who are in clinical practice. Many of the tools to be covered focus on high prevalence disorders, so it may be most relevant to primary care/ private practice settings, although the meta-skills may also be relevant to secondary care settings.

Ideally, participants will have a basic understanding of e-MH resources. Participants who do not have this knowledge will be invited to gain it prior to the workshop by:

  • Viewing a free introductory webinar (recorded and available online on demand)
  • Exploring e-MH resources of interest to them. A list of key online sites and resources will be provided to all participants prior to the workshop
  • Interacting with the presenters and their peers in an online community of practice

Half day workshop # 7: A psychologist's family law survival guide

Presenter: Michael Lynch (Michael Lynch Family Lawyers)

Divorce is a national problem. To make matters worse the Family Law Act has undergone extensive changes over the years making it almost impossible to keep up with. Not only are psychologists meant to know enough to understand what clients are going through but they also need to be able to safeguard themselves . This interactive workshop will assist psychologists in this area by providing a plain English explanation of the law as it impacts someone going through separation (including parenting arrangements, domestic violence, mediation options, and documenting agreements), but also as it impacts the practitioner, (highlighting their responsibilities, confidentiality issues and other potential areas of exposure). This workshop will enable attendees to better assist clients and also navigate challenges for themselves.

Professional development hours: 6

Learning outcomes:

Upon completion of this workshop participants will be able to:

  • ·What has changed in the Family Law Act and in domestic violence and will be better equipped to help clients navigate the changes.
  • ·And become aware of the potential risks and exposures to confidentiality and thereby better able to safeguard themselves and provide a professional   service.
  • ·What they are obliged to tell clients.
  • ·What types of subpoena there are and how to respond.
  • ·What mediation is and how it works.
  • About the use and mis-use of Family Reports.
  • ·How agreements can be documented and many other practical considerations.

Workshop content:

The workshop will cover:

Session 1 - "Helping you help your client"

  • Understanding legal terms and concepts (including parenting, mediation and domestic violence).
  • Looking at likely outcomes.
  • How to  document  agreements .
  • Legal tips and traps.

Session 2 - "Helping you help yourself"

  • Processes (Court and FDR options)
  • Recent guidelines and protocols (Domestic Violence and Family Reports)
  • What is 'confidentiality'? (Subpoenas and note taking)
  • Understanding Family Reports

Audience:

The attendee for this workshop does not need any prior legal knowledge or experience. The legal concepts will be communicated without jargon and in a plain English style. Ideally, attendees will be (or will have an interest in) working in the area of family and relationship psychology (whether that be adult or child). Attendees will not need to have any formal or specified psychology training or qualifications for attendance at the workshop.


Half day workshop # 8: Relationships and family: Innovative family assessment and treatment methods toward healthy families

Presenter: Sandra Neil (Satir Centre of Australia)

This programme encompasses both the intrapsychic and interactive components of therapy.  Much therapy of the past has been focussed only on behaviour, cognition, or affect.  This model is focussed on bringing about positive change at the level of existence, as well as changes in doing, feeling, and perceiving.  The process taps the universal yearnings of individuals within personal family and social systems, helping work towards a sense of responsible wholeness.  The process requires that the therapist has a high level of therapeutic competence and congruence in use of self. Skill development in practice using the Multicultural Family Chessboard.  

Professional development hours: 3

Learning outcomes:

Upon completion of this workshop participants will be able to:

  • Learn to make contact and build rapport with people to stimulate their own healing powers.
  • Understand and incorporate the basic therapeutic belief systems of the Satir Model.
  • Uncover and identify communication and coping patterns e.g. triangulation and the importance of jealousy and envy in blended families.
  • Prepare family maps (genograms): patterns of relating, wounds to ‘acceptances’, and the past no longer contaminating the present.   
  • Use sculpting to reveal relationships among family members and bring to awareness new coping patterns.
  • Encourage people to accept and utilise their internal strengths and resources.
  • Transform family rules and learn ‘The Fringe Benefits of Failure and the Importance of Imagination’ (J.K Rowling).
  • Enabling new choice-making.
  • Map the internal processes between wishes, rules, feelings, perceptions, and expectations.
  • Learn a simple method to work with both individuals, relatives or families with “The Family Chessboard” Neil Sandra E.S., and Silverberg, Robert L, Illustrated Trusler Peter (15th February 2013), The Family Chessboard, eBook (PDF), 121 Pages, ISBN 9780987393616 © The Satir Centre of Australia (Standard Copyright Licence) 

Workshop content:

The workshop will cover:

  • The Essential Elements of Therapeutic Change: The Four Meta-Goals for Therapy.
  • “When I Meet a Person” Exercise.
  • Survival Stances
  • Double Level Messages
  • The Mind Speaks Through the Body (Psyche and Soma)
  • Physical Manifestations of Stances
  • The Family Triad and Triangulation.
  • Parenting:  3 = 1, Family Exercise, Fathering, Archetypes of Women and Men.
  • What Children Need for Self Esteem
  • Mapping: Creation of Family of Origin Maps
  • Anchoring Changes in the Intrapsychic and Interactive Systems – Unmet Needs, the Wishes, Yearnings.  The Patterns of Shoulds, Oughts, Musts, The Rules. The Cognitive and Behavioural Component
  • The Multicultural Family Chessboard.

Audience:

The course is for practising clinical psychologists, counselling psychologists, family psychologists, educational psychologists and family therapists who are presently, or expect to be, working with clients. The focus of the Programme will be using modern systemic therapy to bring about successful change.  Participants will be interested in newer innovative techniques for use in blended and newer forms of the family, including IVF, LGBTIQA, single-gender, and single parent families. The focus will be on family psychology as well as learning to bring about transformational change within individuals, relationships, and family systems. 


Half day workshop # 9: Therapist in your pocket: The emerging use of telehealth and mhealth for treatment of mental health issues: Implications for clinical practice

Presenter : Qusai Hussain (PsyLegal)

With advances in technology and the emerging use of Tele-health in the health profession there are many positive implications for mental health professionals. Clinicians will be provided with information on the changing landscape of Mobile and Tele-health and, in combination with the popularisation of smartphones, how this can be used to provide treatments for hard to reach populations (i.e. rural and remote areas), engagement with early adopters such as young people and offer a blended approach to treatment using a combination of virtual, real-time face-to-face counseling with in-person counseling. Participants will be introduced to existing Tele-health systems around the world, including the purpose built software platform Cyber Clinic, and legislative changes both internationally and locally that have allowed for increasing Tele-health adoption. Clinical practice adoption of Tele-health systems will be discussed using case studies and Medico-legal implications and start-up challenges will be canvassed for sole practitioners and group practices.

Professional development hours: 3

Learning outcomes:

Upon completion of this workshop participants will be able to:

  • Educate clinicians on the emergence of Tele-health in Australia and how this benefits patients and practitioners in remote, rural and regional areas.
  • Provide participants with information on who qualifies for providing Tele-health services under Medicare, and information and statistics on the individuals eligible to receive such services.
  • Update psychologists with the most recent research surrounding the effectiveness of interventions via video-consultation, and how this compares to face-to-face in-person treatment.
  • Equip participants with strategies and recommendations to adapt Tele-health systems to their clinical practice.

Workshop content:

The workshop will cover:

  • Definition of Tele-health.
  • The emergence of Tele-health in the Australian health-care system.
  • The emergence and recent popularisation of Tele-health Medicare services.  
  • Prevalence of Mental Health issues and suicide rates amongst individuals living in Rural, Remote & Regional areas compared to individuals living in Major cities.
  • “The gap”; the reason for high mental illness/suicide rate amongst hard-to-reach populations.
  • “Bridging the gap”; Tele-health as a solution, as a way to provide individuals living outside major cities with clinical expertise.
  • The convenience of innovative virtual counselling systems for clients and practitioners. 
  • Research on the effective-ness of psychological intervention via virtual counselling.
  • Population statistics for rural, remote and regional areas.
  • Future of Tele-health for Clinicians.
  • Current Tele-health and M-Health Systems that can be adapted to private and public practice.
  • Recommendations and Strategies to adapt Tele-health Services to clinical practice.

Audience:

This workshop is suitable for all mental health practitioners, whether recently qualified or very experienced including all psychologists, psychiatrists, social workers, mental-health nurses and general practitioners.


Half day workshop # 10: Therapy with children, adolescents and families in the digital age: Helping families cope with gaming, social media and relationships online

Presenter: Kirrilie Smout (Developing Minds Psychology and Education)

With over 95% of Australian children and teenagers using internet enabled digital devices (computers, tablets and phones) to communicate, game and access information/entertainment, there is a desperate need for families and carers to know how to navigate this digital world: to both manage the pitfalls and find the benefits in technology for their families mental health and emotional wellbeing.

As therapists who work with kids, teens and families, we need to help them cope with the very real threats to mental and emotional health posed by technology – as well as help them harness the underutilised benefits to wellbeing that technology also brings.

Professional development hours: 3

Learning outcomes:

Upon completion of this workshop participants will be able to:

  • Be familiar with the apps, games, platforms, social media that children and teens are using in 2016/17.
  • Be aware of under-utilised benefits of young people using technology (ie accessing these apps, online games and programs) and how technology can promote well-being in young people
  • Know how to use these benefits in a therapy context to improve mental health outcomes for the young people they work with
  • Be aware of the specific, potential risks and dangers of apps, gaming and social media for young people
  • Know how to assess - specifically and differentially - for the various risks and dangers of technology use in young people
  • Be familiar with a range of possible psychological interventions to use with children and young people in managing these risks and dangers
  • Know how to help parents and carers prepare their young people to avoid these risks and dangers
  • Know resources and potential interventions for using technology, sites and apps in the therapy session with children and teens
  • Know how to help parents put consistent, compassionate rules around screen time (and dealing with noncompliance, difficulty getting off screens)
  • Know the implications (including reporting requirements) of sexting and online pornography use in teens

Workshop content:

The workshop will cover:

  • Statistics about the extent and type of technology use in children/young people in Australia
  • Identifying the potential benefits (to emotional and psychological health) of technology use for young people
  • Identifying how these benefits might be used within therapy with young people
  • Overview of the potential risks and dangers of variety of forms of technology use in young people
  • In depth consideration of social conflict/cyberbullying in young people and how to assess and provide therapeutic interventions with young people
  • In depth consideration of how technology use can interfere with sleep and education in young people, and how to assess and provide therapeutic interventions with young people
  • In depth consideration of sexting and pornography access in young people and how to assess and provide therapeutic interventions with young people
  • Possible interventions to use with parents in managing young people’s technology use
  • Potential apps, programs and platforms which can be used in therapy rooms to enhance therapeutic goals

Audience:

Participants who would benefit:

  • Therapists working with children, adolescents and families.

Desirable entry level knowledge/skills:

  • Therapists who have experience in providing therapy to children, young people and families in a clinical setting

Half day workshop # 11: Working with highly avoidant clients, a schema therapy approach

Presenters: Ruth Holt (Canberra Clinical and Forensic Psychology) and Rita Younan (Schema Therapy Department, The Victoria Clinic)

The detached client, the overly-analytical client, the client who never does homework, the chronic procrastinator, the traumatised client who can’t engage in treatment. These client characteristics are challenging regardless of the diagnosis and sometimes considered “treatment resistant”.

This workshop will provide a Schema Therapy approach to understanding avoidance in the therapeutic settings and practical strategies for working with highly avoidant clients. We will provide case studies and opportunities to practice skills in the workshop, with the aim of helping clinicians engage avoidant clients in therapy more effectively and ultimately obtain better treatment outcomes

Professional development hours: 3

Learning outcomes:

Upon completion of this workshop participants will be able to:

1. Understand avoidance as a coping response and ability to identify common avoidant presentations such as

  • Detached Protector
  • Avoidant Protector
  • Detached Self-soother

2. Skills in connecting avoidance to underlying schemas

3. Observe and practice Schema Therapy interventions including

  • Mode Dialogues with avoidant modes and Healthy Adult mode
  • Imagery work

Workshop content:

The workshop will cover:

  1. Define avoidant coping within Young’s schema mode model (2005)

Provide an overview of relevant literature

  • Use case studies and demonstrations to illustrate avoidant presentations
  1. Provide information about schemas and relate content to participant’s YSQ – L3 results
  • Refer back to case presentations to illustrate connection between schema activation and avoidant coping
  • Participants will also have been asked to bring a difficult avoidant client scenario which they will then be able to reflect on in small groups
  1. Introduce the 2 interventions
  • Demonstrate both interventions
  • Participants engage in role plays using their ‘difficult client’ as the basis for the intervention

Audience:

Participants working with adolescents and adults, in a range of settings will benefit from this workshop. Ideally participants would have some knowledge of Schema Therapy and experience working in a clinical setting, with CBT skills already developed in order to make the most of the training.


Half day workshop # 12: Orientation to neurofeedback for mental health professionals

Presenter: Michelle Aniftos (Mylne Street Mental Health)

Neurofeedback is emerging as a significant therapeutic intervention for a range of disorders including, AD/HD, anxiety, autism, pain, and behaviour disorders. Neurofeedback also benefits healthy clients with peak performance goals e.g. athletes.   As mental health practitioners, we are very focussed on psychological processes influencing daily functioning.  Neurofeedback enables both client and practitioner to have greater insight and capacity to influence the underlying physiological processes that contribute to perceptions and behaviour. 

This didactic education program is accredited by the Biofeedback Certification International Alliance (BCIA) and introduces the concepts associated with EEG and EEG-guided behavioural intervention, addressing symptoms of disorder, their neurophysiological attributes, and the research evidence for neurofeedback intervention.

Professional development hours: 3

Learning outcomes:

Upon completion of this workshop participants will be able to:

  • Develop insight into the neural circuitry involved in mood, anxiety, attention, memory & sleep and the application of EEG biofeedback (neurofeedback) for modulation of brain states toward healthy functioning.
  • Identify the application of learning theory and principles to neurofeedback.
  • Review the research history and current evidence for neurofeedback.

Workshop content:

Definition of Neurofeedback

  1. Structure and function of the Central Nervous System
  2. Measures of electrical activity of subcortical or cortical origin [electroencephalography (EEG), event related potentials (ERPs), slow cortical potentials (SCPs)]
  3. Biofeedback of brainwave data in an operant conditioning paradigm

Overview of principles of human learning as they apply to biofeedback

  1. Learning theory (e.g. habituation, classical and operant conditioning, discrimination, shaping, generalization and extinction.)
  2. Application of learning principles to NFB (e.g., generalization to the life situation, discrimination training, length and number of sessions, etc.)

Research Evidence for Neurofeedback

  1. History and Development of Neurofeedback pioneers, seminal studies, merging developments).
  2. Interpretation of the methodological and statistical criteria and procedures for determining levels of efficacy and effectiveness of neurofeedback, as outlined in La Vaque et al., 2002. 

Key research studies establishing current efficacy levels of major applications of Neurofeedback (e.g., ADHD, Substance Abuse, Optimal Performance, etc.)

Audience:

This Orientation to Neurofeedback workshop is designed as a continuing professional development opportunity for health care professionals from a range of fields including, but not limited to, psychology, nursing, physiotherapy, dentistry, osteopathy, occupational therapy, chiropractic, social work, speech pathology or medicine. Students and others with an interest in applied neuroscience may also participate in the seminar#.

(#When treating a medical or psychological disorder, one must carry a state issued license/credential in an approved health care field or if unlicensed, must work under appropriate supervision.)


Half day workshop # 13: Mindfulness-integrated CBT for trauma: Using the mindfulness-based interoceptive exposure task

Presenter: Bruno Cayoun (MiCBT Institute)

As mindfulness-based interventions are increasingly used to address a wide range of conditions, clinicians need as much training as possible with complex clients, especially those with a trauma history. The purpose of this specialised workshop is to deepen our understanding of operant conditioning and exposure principles, and learn mindfulness-based exposure methods for clients with trauma symptoms. These will include novel exposure methods to decrease avoidance and reduce the distress caused by panic attacks and traumatic memories. These methods will be demonstrated through role-playing and video demonstrations. The workshop will also teach how to case-conceptualise clients’ avoidance and other aversive reactions to traumatic symptoms, according to the co-emergence model of reinforcement, to increase the accuracy of treatment. Although this workshop is clinically oriented, it will also benefit anyone interested in a new understanding of reinforcement principles.

Professional development hours: 3

Learning outcomes:

Upon completion of this workshop participants will be able to:

  • Deepen our understanding of operant conditioning based on neurophenomenological evidence
  • Use the co-emergence model of reinforcement to improve case-conceptualisation of trauma clients’ behaviour
  • Understand the nature of mindfulness-based exposure
  • Use the MIET as a distress reduction method  
  • Use the mindfulness-based interoceptive exposure task (MIET) to decrease avoidance

Workshop content:

  • The neurophenomenology of reinforcement
  • The case conceptualisation of avoidant behaviour based on the co-emergence model of reinforcement
  • The principles of mindfulness-based exposure
  • How the mindfulness-based interoceptive exposure task decreases distress
  • How the mindfulness-based interoceptive exposure task decreases avoidance

Audience:

This workshop is designed to meet the needs of all clinical psychologists, postgraduate students training in clinical psychology, psychiatrists with a good understanding of reinforcement principles, as well as clinical researchers in the field of mental health. In order to maximise the likelihood of achieving training objectives, the participants must have a working knowledge of CBT and some understanding of mindfulness. Having taught and personally practised mindfulness meditation is an advantage, but not a requirement. 


Half day workshop # 14: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) in children and young people

Presenter: Vanessa Spiller (Jumpstart Psychology / Australian Catholic University )

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders are largely unrecognised and under-diagnosed in clinical practice and many professionals lack the confidence and knowledge to identify and work with those affected by these complex conditions. This workshop aims to provide participants with an understanding of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders and how these disorders present clinically in children and young people. The workshop will explore the new Australian diagnostic criteria for these disorders as well as the many challenges involved in diagnosing individuals. The workshop will also explore intervention options for individuals with these disorders as well as the support needs of those who care for them.

Professional development hours: 3

Learning outcomes:

Upon completion of this workshop participants will be able to:

  • Identify the prevalence of FASD in the national and international contexts
  • Identify the diagnostic criteria for assessing FASD in Australia
  • Identify common issues in diagnosing FASD
  • Identify common presentations of FASD in children and young people
  • Identify how FASD impacts on the lives and learning of children and young people
  • Identify suitable interventions that can be used with children and young people with FASD
  • Identify strategies for supporting carers of children and young people with FASD

Workshop content:

  • Define prevalence of FASD in international context
  • Define prevalence of FASD in Australian context
  • Define FASD
  • Explain diagnostic criteria and frameworks in Australian context
  • Explain common barriers to diagnosing FASD
  • Demonstrate presentation of FASD in early development
  • Demonstrate presentation of FASD in physical appearance and growth
  • Demonstrate presentation of FASD in communication and speech
  • Demonstrate presentation of FASD in memory/learning/information processing
  • Demonstrate presentation of FASD in behaviour regulation
  • Demonstrate presentation of FASD in abstract thinking and judgement
  • Demonstrate presentation of FASD in planning and organisation
  • Demonstrate presentation of FASD in spatial sills/spatial memory
  • Demonstrate presentation of FASD in motor skills
  • Demonstrate presentation of FASD in social skills/adaptive behaviour
  • Demonstrate presentation of FASD in academic performance
  • Define Neuro-behavioural and Collaborative Proactive Solutions approaches as it applies to FASD
  • Explain environmental adaptations for caregivers and teachers
  • Explain expectation adaptations for caregivers and teachers
  • Explain adaptations in execution of tasks for caregivers and teachers

Audience:

As FASD is a largely undiagnosed and poorly recognised in routine clinical practice, it is expected that most participants, even very experienced psychologists will have a limited understanding of the disorders included in this spectrum. The workshop is therefore suitable for psychologists (and other health professionals) of all experience levels from students to those with extensive experience. It will likely be of most interest to those working with children and young people with complex behavioural and mental health issues including those working in the areas of Juvenile Justice, child protection and addictions and substance abuse. 


Half day workshop # 15: Build social and emotional skills using the secret agent society computer game

Presenter: Kathleen Davey (Social Skills Training Institute)

Using technology can be a great way to engage and teach kids.Learn to use the Secret Agent Society (SAS) Computer Game Pack to teach kids (8-12 years old) how to recognise emotions, express their feelings in appropriate ways and manage social challenges.

Originally developed for children with Asperger’s, SAS is now used world-wide with children who have other social-emotional challenges, including ADHD, anxiety and anger problems.

Through a mix of multimedia presentations and interactive activities, participants learn how to use the SAS Computer Game Pack to meet child therapy goals and to support skill generalisation across home and school.

Professional development hours: 3

Learning outcomes:

Upon completion of this workshop participants will be able to:

  • Familiarisation with the Secret Agent Society Computer Game levels and activities
  • Knowledge and practice of techniques for meeting a range of child treatment and learning goals related to social skills, emotion recognition, emotion regulation, and problem solving.
  • Identify strategies for optimising transference of skills from therapy to real life
  • Knowledge and practice in managing child resistance and other process issues
  • Identify approaches for facilitating game play with individuals, and small or large groups

Workshop content:

  • Overview of Secret Agent Society computer game levels and activities:
    • Games that teach children how to recognise simple and complex emotions in others from face, voice, body and situational clues
    • Interactive quizzes to test understanding and track children’s progress as they learn skills
    • Activities to increase awareness of body clues and thoughts that signal the intensity of one’s own feelings
    • An electronic scene generator to help ‘junior detectives’ visualise and reflect on social interactions
    • Animated choose-your-own-adventure style missions that teach different ways of coping with unpleasant feelings and social challenges
    • A series of missions that help with applying skills from the game to real life

    • How to facilitating game play with individuals, small groups and large groups
    • Using the SAS computer game and other session activities to assess and teach social and emotional skills such as:
      • recognising simple and complex emotions in others
      • recognising the presence and intensity of own emotions
      • coping strategies for unpleasant feelings
      • identifying unhelpful thoughts and replacing them with more helpful alternatives
      • self-reflection and perspective-taking in social interactions
      • skills for conversation and play with peers
      • considering the social consequences of one’s actions
      • responding to social challenges, such as being bullied, trying new things, working as a team and making mistakes
      • Promoting the generalisation and maintenance of children’s emotional regulation and friendship skills at home and at school
      • Useful strategies for managing child resistance and other process issues
      • Overview of past and current research using Secret Agent Society

Audience:

Workshop is most suitable for professionals working with children or adolescents with social-emotional challenges, for example:

  • Psychologists and other Allied Health professionals
  • Teachers and other education support staff

The Secret Agent Society Computer Game is an espionage-themed resource designed for children 8 to 12 years old. The program was originally developed for children with Autism Spectrum Disorders; however current research and feedback from professionals and parents support its use and effectiveness with children who have other social and emotional challenges, including ADHD, anxiety and anger management problems.


Half day workshop # 16: Working with traumatised children in clinical and school settings

Presenter: Catherine Wood (Swinburne University of Technology)

The aim of this three-hour workshop is to provide participants with an understanding of evidence-based treatments for working with traumatised children in clinical and school settings, and to apply this understanding to psychological practice using case examples. The difference between single incident trauma and complex trauma will be discussed. The importance of using an attachment lens when working with this client group will be emphasised as well understanding the neurobiology of attachment. Key therapeutic principles will also be highlighted, including the role of the therapeutic alliance, creativity, consistency, and compassion. 

Professional development hours: 3

Learning outcomes:

Upon completion of this workshop participants will be able to:

  • Understand trauma, relevant diagnoses and assessment practices.  2. Understand the difference between single incident trauma and complex trauma and the implications for treatment for children. 
  • Understand the importance of using an attachment lens when working with complex trauma in children, including neurobiology of attachment. 
  • Understand the evidence-based treatments for working with childhood trauma in clinical and school settings
  • Apply therapeutic principles to the work with traumatised children in school and clinical settings using case examples.

Workshop content:

  • Definition of trauma
  • Single incident trauma and complex trauma
  • Relevant Trauma related diagnoses
  • Assessment of trauma
  • Attachment theory and trauma and neuroscience
  • Evidence based treatments for working with traumatised children in clinical and school settings
  • Therapeutic principles
  • Case illustrations

Audience:

Practitioners working with children in clinical and school settings who have been affected by single incident and/or complex trauma would benefit from attending this workshop. Participants should have training in psychology, social work, youth work, or be working as a counsellor or psychotherapist. Teachers could also benefit from this workshop. Prior experience working with children with diverse clinical presentations in a range of settings would be desirable.